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2020-21

Essential Objectives

Web Schedule Summer 2020


Revision Date: 22-Apr-20

SOC-1010-VU01 - Introduction to Sociology


Online Class


Online courses take place 100% online via Canvas, without required in-person or Zoom meetings.


Synonym: 185087

Location: Winooski - Meets Online

Credits: 3 (45 hours)
Day/Times: Meets online
Semester Dates: 05-26-2020 to 08-17-2020
Last day to drop without a grade: 06-11-2020 - Refund Policy
Last day to withdraw (W grade): 07-14-2020 - Refund Policy
Faculty: Virginia Merriam | View Faculty Credentials
This course has started, please contact the offering academic center about registration
This section meets the following General Education Requirement(s):
Human Behavior
    Note
  1. Many degree programs have specific general education recommendations. In order to avoid taking unnecessary classes, please consult with additional resources like your program evaluation, your academic program page, and your academic advisor.
  2. Courses may only be used to meet one General Education Requirement.

Browse the Canvas Site for this class.

Course Description:

A survey of the basic issues, concepts, theories and methods of sociology. Students learn to think critically about the nature of society and social institutions, and the relationship among individuals and groups. Topics will include social organization, socialization and social change, social stratification, class and class conflict, gender, race, and ethnicity.

Essential Objectives:

1. Describe the origin and development of sociology as a social science and give examples of how sociological concepts, theories, and methods can be used to explain cultural and social phenomena around the world.
2. Discuss how the interrelationships of heredity, environment, and social agents contribute to the development and socialization of the self.
3. Discuss the influence of social, cultural, and institutional contexts on behavior norms in global societies.
4. Compare the structure and function of various social groups and identify the factors which affect group dynamics.
5. Differentiate between functionalist, conflict, and interactionist explanations of deviance and social control.
6. Compare theories of social stratification and discuss resulting inequalities such as class, power, prestige, gender, ethnicity, age, and ability.
7. Identify key social institutions such as the family, education, religion, politics, and economy, and examine their composition and function in global societies.
8. Demonstrate and interpret how demographic and statistical research is used to understand and respond to social change and recognize critical questions about quantitative claims.
9. Describe the applications of sociology locally and globally and the various roles that sociologists play in today's societies.

Methods:

IMPORTANT NOTE:

This class will involve reading the assigned textbook, assigned readings, guest speakers and significant class participation by the student. I am always available should a student need a little extra help but remember you are a major contributor to your own education. If you need assistance JUST ASK.

Teaching methods used will comprise of lectures, general discussion, use of audio/video recordings, Power Point presentations and the like. Small group, whole class discussions, writing assignments, and a final paper will be utilized.

Evaluation Criteria:

20%- Written Assignments

20% - Discussion Forums

20%- Quizzes

20% - Final Paper

20%- Participation

Grading Criteria:

Grades are based on your efforts and participation. If you spend the required time reading the text and handouts, participating in class and give it your best effort, you will do fine! I am also here to help you along the way. The textbook we are using has lots of information in it. Some of this information may or may not be discussed, but knowing that information is YOUR responsibility.

A+ through A-For any work to receive an “A” it must clearly be exceptional or outstanding work. It must demonstrate keen insight and original thinking. It must not only demonstrate full understanding of the topic or issues addressed, but it must also provide critical analysis of these. In addition, an “A” grade reflects the student’s ability to clearly and thoughtfully articulate his or her learning.

B+ through B- For any work to receive a “B” it must be good to excellent work. It must demonstrate strong originality, comprehension, critical thinking, and attention to detail. In addition, a “B” grade reflects a student’s ability to clearly articulate his or her learning.

C+ through C-For any work to receive a “C” it must meet the expectations of the assignment. It must demonstrate a solid comprehension, critical thinking, and attention to detail. In addition, a “C” reflects a student’s ability to adequately articulate his or her learning.

D+ through D- For any work to receive a “D” it must marginally meet the expectations of the assignment. It demonstrates minimal comprehension, critical thinking, and attention to detail. In addition, a “D” grade may reflect a student’s difficulty in articulating his or her learning.

F- Work that receives an “F” grade does not meet the expectations or objectives of the assignment. It demonstrates consistent problems with comprehension, organization, critical thinking and supporting details. In addition, an “F” grade reflects a student’s inability to articulate his or her learning. Students are strongly urged to discuss this grade with their instructor and advisor.

P-Equivalent to a D (+/-) or better and therefore course will not count as credit for specific program requirements or competence area requirements.

NP- Indicates failure to meet course objectives and/or failure to meet grading criteria for successful completion as described in the instructor’s course description.

Textbooks:

Summer 2020 textbook data will be available on April 6. On that date a link will be available below that will take you to eCampus, CCV's bookstore. The information provided there will be for this course only. Please see this page for more information regarding the purchase of textbooks.

SOC-1010-VU01 Textbooks.

The last day to use a Financial Aid advance to purchase textbooks is the 3rd Tuesday of the semester. See your financial aid counselor at your academic center if you have any questions.

Contact Faculty:

Email: Virginia Merriam
Hiring Coordinator for this course: Gilberto Diaz Santos

Attendance Policy:

There is a maximum of 2 absences allowed for this class. It is expected that students will be PRESENT and PREPARED for all classes during the semester. Emergencies do happen and these will be handled on a case-by-case basis. Should a student miss more than 2 classes, a student conference will be called and an action plan devised. All missed assignments must be made up.

Accessibility Services for Students with Disabilities: CCV strives to mitigate barriers to course access for students with documented disabilities. To request accommodations, please

  1. Provide disability documentation to the Accessibility Coordinator at your academic center. https://ccv.edu/discover-resources/students-with-disabilities/
  2. Request an appointment to meet with accessibility coordinator to discuss your request and create an accommodation plan.
  3. Once created, students will share the accommodation plan with faculty. Please note, faculty cannot make disability accommodations outside of this process.

Academic Honesty: CCV has a commitment to honesty and excellence in academic work and expects the same from all students. Academic dishonesty, or cheating, can occur whenever you present -as your own work- something that you did not do. You can also be guilty of cheating if you help someone else cheat. Being unaware of what constitutes academic dishonesty (such as knowing what plagiarism is) does not absolve a student of the responsibility to be honest in his/her academic work. Academic dishonesty is taken very seriously and may lead to dismissal from the College.

Course description details subject to change. Please refer to this document frequently.

To check on space availability, choose Search for Classes.


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