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Web Schedule Summer 2019


Revision Date: 08-May-19

SOC-1010-VR01 - Introduction to Sociology


Synonym: 176073
Location: Rutland
Credits: 3 (45 hours)
Day/Times: Thursday, 05:30P - 09:00P
Semester Dates: 05-23-2019 to 08-08-2019
Last day to drop without a grade: 06-10-2019 - Refund Policy
Last day to withdraw (W grade): 07-08-2019 - Refund Policy
Faculty: Melissa Holmes | View Faculty Credentials
This course has started, please contact the offering academic center about registration
This section meets the following General Education Requirement(s):
Human Behavior
    Note
  1. Many degree programs have specific general education recommendations. In order to avoid taking unnecessary classes, please consult with additional resources like your program evaluation, your academic program page, and your academic advisor.
  2. Courses may only be used to meet one General Education Requirement.

Comments: No class 7/4.

Course Description:

A survey of the basic issues, concepts, theories and methods of sociology. Students learn to think critically about the nature of society and social institutions, and the relationship among individuals and groups. Topics will include social organization, socialization and social change, social stratification, class and class conflict, gender, race, and ethnicity.

Essential Objectives:

1. Describe the origin and development of sociology as a social science and give examples of how sociological concepts, theories, and methods can be used to explain cultural and social phenomena.
2. Discuss how the interrelationships of heredity, environment, and social agents contribute to the development and socialization of the self.
3. Discuss the influence of social, cultural, and institutional contexts on behavior norms.
4. Compare the structure and function of various social groups and identify the factors which affect group dynamics.
5. Differentiate between functionalist, conflict, and interactionist explanations of deviance and social control.
6. Compare theories of social stratification and discuss resulting inequalities such as class, power, prestige, gender, ethnicity, age, and ability.
7. Identify key social institutions such as the family, education, religion, politics, and economy, and examine their composition and function in society.
8. Demonstrate and interpret how demographic and statistical research is used to understand and respond to social change and recognize critical questions about quantitative claims.
9. Describe the applications of sociology locally and globally and the various roles that sociologists play in today's society.

Methods:

  

Teaching Methods/Learning Activities

 

 
  • Small-group and whole-class discussion
  • Guest Lecturers 
  • Mini-lectures
  • Small group activities
  • In-class reaction writing and writing assignments
  • Quizzes
  • Mid-term and final exams
  • Research project of the student's choosing reflecting the material covered in this course.
  • Use of movies and modern works of fiction and fact.

Evaluation Criteria:

How you will be graded in this course:

Final Paper and Presentation: 20% of your Total Grade

Tests and First Study: 30 % of your Total Grade

Classroom Participation and Preparation: 10%

Papers and Assignments: 40% of your grade

 

Grading Criteria:

A+ through A-: For any work to receive an "A," it must clearly be exceptional or outstanding work. It must demonstrate keen insight and original thinking. It must not only demonstrate full understanding of the topic or issues addressed, but it must also provide a critical analysis of these. In addition, an "A" grade reflects a student's ability to clearly and thoughtfully articulate his or her learning.

B+ through B-: For any work to receive a "B," it must be good to excellent work. It must demonstrate strong originality, comprehension, critical thinking, and attention to detail. In addition, a "B" grade reflects a student's ability to clearly articulate his or her learning.

C+ through C-: For any work to receive a "C," it must meet the expectations of the assignment. It must demonstrate solid comprehension, critical thinking, and attention to detail. In addition, a "C" grade reflects a student's ability to adequately articulate his or her learning.

D+ through D-: For any work to receive a "D," it must marginally meet the expectations of the assignment. It demonstrates minimal comprehension, critical thinking, and attention to detail. In addition, a "D" grade may reflect a student's difficulty in articulating his or her learning.

F: Work that receives an "F" grade does not meet the expectations or objectives of the assignment. It demonstrates consistent problems with comprehension, organization, critical thinking, and supporting details. In addition, an "F" grade reflects a student's inability to articulate his or her learning. Students are strongly urged to discuss this grade with their instructor and advisor.

P: Equivalent to D (+/-) or better and therefore course will not count as credit for specific program requirements or competence area requirements.

NP: indicates failure to meet course objectives and/or failure to meet grading criteria for successful completion as described in the instructor's course description.

Textbooks:

Summer 2019 textbook data will be available on April 1. On that date a link will be available below that will take you to eCampus, CCV's bookstore. The information provided there will be for this course only. Please see this page for more information regarding the purchase of textbooks.

The last day to use a Financial Aid advance to purchase textbooks is the 3rd Tuesday of the semester. See your financial aid counselor at your academic center if you have any questions.

Contact Faculty:

Email: Melissa Holmes
Hiring Coordinator for this course: Pamela O'Connor

Attendance Policy:

Attendance Policy: Regular attendance and participation in classes are essential components of a student's success in college and are completion requirements for courses at CCV. Please be aware that missing more than three (3) classes will result in a non-satisfactory grade. A pattern of late arrival or early departure will constitute absence at the instructor's discretion.

Syllabus:

Summer 2019- Introduction to Sociology

Introduction to Sociology
Course Syllabus Summer 2019

Instructor: Melissa A. Elwell-Holmes, J.D. BA, AEMT, NY FF I
Address: 104 Mountain Way, Hebron, NY 12832
Phone: 518-268-7825
Email: mae11080@ccv.vsc.edu

Private email maeemtb@yahoo.com

This Class is 12 Weeks from 5/23 to 8/8( no class July 4th, that lecture will go online for the week) Class runs from 5:30 to 9:00 due to the shortened schedule for summer courses.

Week One: 5/23
Introduction to the Sociology Project 2.0
We will go over the syllabus and course expectations. We will discuss proper conversation rules and guidelines for discussion etiquette. The Water Jug Experiment. I will cover Chapter 1.
Assignment due 5/30: Read Chapters 1 &2 of your text and the following:
On page 7 of your text and in class we talked about Aphorisms. Please provide four aphorisms that have guided you in your life; or that you think apply to how you live your life, or hope to live your life. Explain in a few short sentences why those four aphorisms apply to you.

Week Two: 5/30
Class- We will cover Chapter 2
Assignment: Read Chapters 3 of your text and please do a 1-2-page paper on your bias, where it comes from, why you cling to it. What gave you the bias in the first place? I also want two examples or proofs that dispute your bias. This should be two pages typed. You will not have to share with the class. A bias can be ugly that is why it is called a bias. I want you to be open and share with me to help you to recognize your bias without any fear of any retribution. I will share my bias in class as well to help you understand what I mean.

Week Three: 6/6
Class: We will cover Chapter 3
Assignment due 6/13: Read Chapters 4for next week. In Chapter 3 we studied sociological research methods. I would like a two-page paper where you must choose which method you most align with and why? I would also like you just to touch on the others and comment on why you did not choose those methods as a fit for you. This will aid you greatly when you perform your first sociological study.


Week Four: 6/13
Class: We will cover Chapter 4 and A visitor on Graph, Pie Chart and Presentation Techniques.
You will complete a paper; which will be five pages in length with You will start with a hypothesis following the rules in Chapter 3; come to me for suggestions of simple topics for your first-time study. Below is an example of exactly the format you will need to submit. You have two weeks to complete the study and paper, this will count as a midterm grade.

Your paper should look like this: This is only an example of a topic. You will need to formulate your own question with me.

Name, title, date.

Question: How many people return their carts to the carriers in a three-hour period?

Hypothesis: I believe over 90% will return their carts to a proper place?

Now answer the 6 questions we discussed from Chapter 3.

•See Table 3.1 p. 56 in your text:

•What questions should a sociologist ask to determine if a research question is even viable.

1. Do I already know the answer? If you know the answer, you are wasting your time to study that.

•2. Is my question researchable- Not for example “When will we have world peace? it must be a question you can answer.

•3. Is my question clear? Make it clear what you want to know.

•4. Does my question have a connection to social scientific scholarship? -Do not repeat something already done. Do a little research, and reinvent yourself and your question, no duplication.

•5. Does my question balance the general and specific- your question cannot be so big that it becomes meaningless or so narrow that only very few people will care or ever know about your research?

•6. Do I care about the answer? - WE must care about our work, or others will not. And if you care too deeply you become an advocate not a scientist!

The next part of the paper should be how you studied, what method you used, why you chose that method, tell us about your experiment. Then provide your data. Make a chart or graph to share with the class during your presentation, this page counts in the total page count.

Next you will discuss what you learned, were you right or wrong. I also want to know what went well or not so well with your study and what you would change in the future. This should easily be five pages in length.

You will study something; anything that interests you and test your hypothesis, and please cite any outside sources you used. The five pages, and does not include the title page or citations, please use 12 pt. font and proper margins and yes it can be double spaced. Be prepared for presenting your hypothesis outcome in class as well as turning your paper and presentation in on June 27th. This Assignment counts as a midterm.

Next Week: In the above proper form you must submit the first page of your study only. This will include the question and hypothesis and six questions for a valid study(again see above example for form and guidance) I will review to make sure you are on the right track for your midterm.

Week Five: 6/20

In Class we will cover Chapter 5.

Assignment: Complete your papers as they are due along with your presentations next week. You will lose 20 points off your paper if it is not submitted. If you miss class for any reason next week, you must submit a valid note. There will be no accepted excuses for late papers.


Week Six: 6/27

Papers Due! In class you will go over your social experiment. A presentation in front of the class will be part of your grade. You will be given a take home test at the end of class this week.

Week Seven: 7/4: No Class Happy 4th of July: You will do your take home test to make up for the class time.

Week Eight: 7/11
We will cover Chapter 10 this week.
Assignment due July 18th. Please read Chapter 11, Race and Ethnicity. “What do you think Racism means?” Give two examples of Racism you have seen in your lifetime; how did it make you feel? Did you do anything about it?


Week Nine: 7/18

The Racism and Ethnicity Chapter 11 will be covered and discussion around your homework and your thoughts about current racial tensions.
Assignment due July 25th: Read Gender and Sexuality which is Chapter 12 in your book. Due to a shortened class schedule in the summer, you must submit for me next week, you questions, hypothesis and six questions in final form for your final sociological study.


Week Ten: 7/25

In Class we will cover Chapter 12 Gender and Sexuality.
Assignment: Due 8/1 Please read Chapter 14: The Sociology of Religion. I would like a three-page paper that outlines what religion means to you. If you are agnostic or atheist or a demonologist; defend why that is your belief and how you came to find that path at this stage in your life. Why do you think Religion is so important in this world?


Week Eleven: 8/1
In Class we will cover Chapter 14; Families and Family life from a Sociological Study perspective. I will also cover the Health of America.

Homework: Complete your final exam studies and short ten minute presentation due next week on the last day of class. This is in lieu of a final exam and will cost you 20% of your grade if you do not complete this paper and presentation.


Week Twelve: 8/8 Your final exam presentations in class today. LAST Class.

Please note: In order to receive accommodations for disabilities in this course, students must make an appointment to see the Americans with Disabilities Coordinator in their site and bring documentation with them.

Academic Honesty: CCV has a commitment to honesty and excellence in academic work and expects the same from all students. Academic dishonesty, or cheating, can occur whenever you present -as your own work- something that you did not do. You can also be guilty of cheating if you help someone else cheat. Being unaware of what constitutes academic dishonesty (such as knowing what plagiarism is) does not absolve a student of the responsibility to be honest in his/her academic work. Academic dishonesty is taken very seriously and may lead to dismissal from the College.

Please note: In order to receive accommodations for disabilities in this course, students must make an appointment to see the Americans with Disabilities Coordinator in their site and bring documentation with them.

Academic Honesty: CCV has a commitment to honesty and excellence in academic work and expects the same from all students. Academic dishonesty, or cheating, can occur whenever you present -as your own work- something that you did not do. You can also be guilty of cheating if you help someone else cheat. Being unaware of what constitutes academic dishonesty (such as knowing what plagiarism is) does not absolve a student of the responsibility to be honest in his/her academic work. Academic dishonesty is taken very seriously and may lead to dismissal from the College.

Course description details subject to change. Please refer to this document frequently.

To check on space availability, choose Search for Classes.


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