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Essential Objectives

Web Schedule Fall 2019


Revision Date: 12-May-19

PSY-1010-VO01 - Introduction to Psychology


Synonym: 185288
Location: Online
Credits: 3 (45 hours)
Day/Times: Meets online
Semester Dates: 09-03-2019 to 12-16-2019
Last day to drop without a grade: 09-23-2019 - Refund Policy
Last day to withdraw (W grade): 11-04-2019 - Refund Policy
Faculty: Robert Mandatta | View Faculty Credentials
This course has started, please contact the offering academic center about registration
This section meets the following General Education Requirement(s):
Human Behavior
    Note
  1. Many degree programs have specific general education recommendations. In order to avoid taking unnecessary classes, please consult with additional resources like your program evaluation, your academic program page, and your academic advisor.
  2. Courses may only be used to meet one General Education Requirement.

Course Description:

A survey of the basic issues, concepts, theories and methods of psychology. Students will increase their awareness of the scientific approach to understanding human behavior through a study of sensory processes, perception, emotion, motivation, intelligence, learning and personality formation.

Essential Objectives:

1. Discuss the development of psychology as a social science.
2. Analyze how current research in neuroscience influences our understanding of the biological and environmental foundations of behavior.
3. Explore how environmental stimuli are sensed and perceived.
4. Describe the nature of consciousness and its relationship to psychological well-being.
5. Experiment with learning and memory formation and evaluate how intelligence is measured.
6. Understand key milestones in language, cognitive, and socio-moral development.
7. Compare theories of motivation and emotion.
8. Identify psychodynamic, behavioral, social, cognitive, and humanistic theories of personality and discuss the approach each takes to understanding human behavior.
9. Give examples of how individuals and groups are influenced in social settings.
10. Evaluate how socio-cultural norms and values shape psychological diagnosis and treatment.
11. Demonstrate proficiency in understanding the scientific method and in interpreting and evaluating statistical and other quantitative data as applied to human behavior.

Additional Instructor Pre-Assignments/Notes/Comments:

Introduction to Psychology is one of my favorite courses to teach because psychology has been a guiding force in my life, one I love to explore with others. Due to America's fascination with psychology, you actually bring a wealth of knowledge to the course, making you well equipped to learn more as you share what you already know about psych theory and practice.

In fact much of the learning will stem directly from you and your student colleagues. I follow a "teaching model" that is based upon the old adage, "The best way to learn something is to teach it." So each week you'll be asked to teach us what you have learned about the assigned topic, using a variety of approaches that include applying psychological theory to a case study and your own experience. Although you may find this challenging at first, soon you will become quite expert at it. Then the fun starts as you experiment with various learning styles and strategies, such as embedding media in your text reports and conducting psychological research in the field.

No matter where you start the course in terms of skill level, by the end you will have improved your knowledge of psychology and sharpened your academic and professional skills.

IMPORTANT NOTE ON OUR BOOKS:
We'll be using a modern crime novel for our primary case study, which is required reading and available online for free:

REQUIRED CASE STUDY NOVEL: Ponzio, B.M. (1999). Lucky's dream. Retrieved from http://www.sundogstories.net/lucky/frames.htm

This crime novel is set in Vermont and contains explicit sexual material, street language, and scenes of graphic violence that require a mature attitude and adult sensibility. For those reasons you may want to review the story before deciding to enroll in this section of Introduction to Psychology.

We will not be using a textbook for this course. Instead, we'll rely on a variety of free online sources, including chapters from e-books or scholarly journal articles, instructional videos and lectures, podcasts, and other forms of relevant media.

COURSE SCHEDULE: This course runs from Tuesday, September 3, through Monday, December 16. Make sure to put a note on your calendar about the exams: Weeks 6 - 8 for both parts of the midterm exam (October 8 - 23) and Weeks 14 - 15 for both parts of the final Exam (December 3 - 16).

No prior online course experience required, just a willingness to learn and the self-discipline to stay focused for this rich immersion into the fascinating world of psychology.


Welcome to online Introduction to Psychology!

Robert

Methods:

1. Readings in our case study novel and other online text or multimedia sources.


2. Weekly participation at the discussion forum that includes:

-- Hosting your own thread by posting an intial refleciton and a final report (over 500 words with correct APA references) that address the assigned topic for the week, and then replying to any comments and questions about your work.

-- Reading every post submitted on time and relying with direct quotes from, comments on, and questions for at least three different posts.

3. Completion of the Midterm Exam, which consists of two parts:

-- Week Six: Posting a midterm report (over 750 words with APA references) and participating in the discussion;

-- Weeks Seven and Eight: Participation in a group midterm activity, which concludes with individual presentations that include media for a full-class discussion.

4. Completion of the Final Exam, which consists of two parts:


-- Week Fourteen: During the second half of the term you will be working on a Vermont-based field research project of your choice, which you will summarize in a final presentation (over 750 words with at least six references and embedded media).

--Week Fifteen: A self-assessment of your learning in this course and/or a fictional account of your future career as a psychologist.

Textbooks:

Fall 2019 textbook data will be available on May 13. On that date a link will be available below that will take you to eCampus, CCV's bookstore. The information provided there will be for this course only. Please see this page for more information regarding the purchase of textbooks.

PSY-1010-VO01 Textbooks.

The last day to use a Financial Aid advance to purchase textbooks is the 3rd Tuesday of the semester. See your financial aid counselor at your academic center if you have any questions.

Contact Faculty:

Email: Robert Mandatta
Hiring Coordinator for this course: Jeremy Vaughn

Attendance Policy:

Due to the interactive nature of online learning, your work must be posted to count, and you cannot make up missed work after the week has ended. You must post at least once during the 24/7 class week to be marked Present.I offer one Free Week of five points for any non-exam forum in case of a conflict (such as a personal or family emergency).

If you encounter technical problems with your computer or server--which happens to all of us periodically--please post from your nearest CCV academic center or from a public access terminalat your local public library, for example.

If you suspect you will not be able to post at all, please let me know right away.

Please note that attendance is not the same as participation, and 100% of your final grade is earned by participating in the class meetings held at our weekly forums (see "Methods" above).If you miss three or more weeks, you cannot earn academic credit for the course, although you are welcome to participate for learning's sake.

Syllabus:

Weekly Assignments, Fall 2019


This concise list of assignments is subject to change without notice, depending upon our needs and progress. So before starting your work each week, carefully read the new week's Announcement and the Discussion Forum instructions. Taken together, these will provide the information you need to successfully complete the week's work.

Week One, September 3 - 9: Why Study Psychology? Read our case study, Lucky's Dream, "Coyote the Trickster" and "Part One: Waiting." Also read, listen to, or view the other online sources provided. At the Discussion forum, host your own thread and reply to any comments and questions about your work. Quote from, comment on, and ask questions for at least three of your colleagues' posts. Essential Objective: 1. Discuss the origin and development of psychology as a social science.

Week Two, September 10 - 16: Stress & Anxiety! Read our case study, Lucky's Dream, "Part Two: Wanting." Also read, listen to, or view the other online sources provided. At the Discussion forum, host your own thread and reply to any comments and questions about your work. Quote from, comment on, and ask questions for at least three of your colleagues' posts. Essential Objective: 3. Discuss the nature of consciousness and its relationship to psychological well-being.

Week Three, September 17 - 23: Consciousness & Altered States. Read our case study, Lucky's Dream, "Part Three: Needing." Also read, listen to, or view the other online sources provided. At the Discussion forum, host your own thread and reply to any comments and questions about your work. Quote from, comment on, and ask questions for at least three of your colleagues' posts. Essential Objective: 3. Discuss the nature of consciousness and its relationship to psychological well-being.

Week Four, September 24 - 30: Diagnosis and Treatment.
Read our case study, Lucky's Dream, "Part Four: Taking." Also read, listen to, or view the other online sources provided. At the Discussion forum, host your own thread and reply to any comments and questions about your work. Quote from, comment on, and ask questions for at least three of your colleagues' posts. Create your first mixed media presentation concerning Essential Objective: 10. Evaluate how socio-cultural norms and values shape psychological diagnosis and treatment.

Week Five, October 1 - 7: Neuroscience Research: What's Love Got to Do With It?
For a case study this week, select a specific example of popular entertainment that focused on romantic love (e.g., a movie, book, magazine article, song or album, video/DVD, TV show, online diversion). Also read, listen to, or view the online sources provided. At the Discussion forum, host your own thread and reply to any comments and questions about your work. Quote from, comment on, and ask questions for at least three of your colleagues' posts. Essential Objective: 2. Analyze how current research in neuroscience influences our understanding of the biological and environmental foundations of behavior.

Week Six, October 8 - 14: Midterm Exam, Part 1: Personal Reflection on Ethical, Religious, and Spiritual Development. Read, listen to, or view the online sources provided and/or find and include your own media. At the Discussion forum, host your own thread and reply to any comments and questions about your work. Quote from, comment on, and ask questions for at least three of your colleagues' posts. Essential Objective: 6. Understand key milestones in . . . socio-moral development.

Weeks Seven and Eight, October 15 - 23: Midterm Exam, Part 2: Social Psychology: Who Leads for Marginalized Vermonters? Read, listen to, or view the online sources provided. Work in your small groups to prepare your nomination for a Vermont Leadership Award, and then post your presentation with embedded media for the entire class with a Q&A session to follow. Essential Objective: 9. Give examples of how individuals and groups are influenced in social settings. (NOTE: October 24 - 28 = course midterm break)

Week Nine, October 29 - November 4: Research Methods & Your Field Research Project. Post about your field research project. Also read, listen to, or view the online sources provided. At the Discussion forum, host your own thread and reply to any comments and questions about your work. Quote from, comment on, and ask questions for at least three of your colleagues' posts. Essential Objective: 11. Demonstrate proficiency in understanding the scientific method and in interpreting and evaluating statistical and other quantitative data as applied to human behavior.

Week Ten, November 5 - 11: Motivation and Emotion.
Read our case study, Lucky's Dream, Part Five, "Giving," through Chapter 17. Post about your field research project. Also read, listen to, or view the online sources provided. At the Discussion forum, host your own thread and reply to any comments and questions about your work. Quote from, comment on, and ask questions for at least three of your colleagues' posts. Essential Objective: 7. Compare theories of motivation and emotion.

Week Eleven, November 12 - 18: Psychological Theories. Read our case study, Lucky's Dream, Part Five, "Giving," from chapter 18 to the end, and Part Six, "Being," through chapter 22. Post about your field research project. Also read, listen to, or view the online sources provided. At the Discussion forum, host your own thread and reply to any comments and questions about your work. Quote from, comment on, and ask questions for at least three of your colleagues' posts. Essential Objective: 8. Identify psychodynamic, behavioral, social, cognitive, and humanistic theories of personality and discuss the approach each takes to understanding human behavior.

Week Twelve, November 19 - 25: Learning, Memory, and Intelligence. Read our case study, Lucky's Dream, Part Six, "Being," from chapter 23 to the end, "Lucky's Dream." Post about your field research project. Also read, listen to, or view the online sources provided. At the Discussion forum, host your own thread and reply to any comments and questions about your work. Quote from, comment on, and ask questions for at least three of your colleagues' posts. Essential Objective: 5. Experiment with learning and memory formation and evaluate how intelligence is measured.

Week Thirteen, November 26 - December 2: Sense & Perception. Read, listen to, or view the online sources provided at our forum. Post about your field research project. At the Discussion forum, host your own thread and reply to any comments and questions about your work. Quote from, comment on, and ask questions for at least three of your colleagues' posts. Essential Objective: 3. Explore how environmental stimuli are sensed and perceived.

Week Fourteen, December 3 - 9: Final Exam, Part 1: Psychology in Vermont. Post your field research presentation, and then comment and raise and reply to questions at the final exam forum. Essential Objective: 9. Give examples of how individuals and groups are influenced in social settings.

Week Fifteen, December 10 - 16: Final Exam, Part 2: First-Person Psychology. Post your choice of either a self-assessment of learning in this course or a fictional account of your future career as a psychologist, and then comment and raise and reply to questions at the final exam forum. Course Description: A survey of the basic issues, concepts, theories and methods of psychology. Students will increase their awareness of the scientific approach to understanding human behavior through a study of sensory processes, perception, emotion, motivation, intelligence, learning and personality formation.

Please note: In order to receive accommodations for disabilities in this course, students must make an appointment to see the Americans with Disabilities Coordinator in their site and bring documentation with them.

Academic Honesty: CCV has a commitment to honesty and excellence in academic work and expects the same from all students. Academic dishonesty, or cheating, can occur whenever you present -as your own work- something that you did not do. You can also be guilty of cheating if you help someone else cheat. Being unaware of what constitutes academic dishonesty (such as knowing what plagiarism is) does not absolve a student of the responsibility to be honest in his/her academic work. Academic dishonesty is taken very seriously and may lead to dismissal from the College.

Course description details subject to change. Please refer to this document frequently.

To check on space availability, choose Search for Classes.


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