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Course Planning by Program

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Essential Objectives

Course Syllabus


Revision Date: 23-Mar-24
 

Fall 2024 | MUS-1010-VO01 - Music Appreciation


Online Class

Online courses take place 100% online via Canvas, without required in-person or Zoom meetings.

Location: Online
Credits: 3 (45 hours)
Day/Times: Meets online
Semester Dates: 09-03-2024 to 12-16-2024
Last day to drop without a grade: 09-16-2024 - Refund Policy
Last day to withdraw (W grade): 11-04-2024 - Refund Policy
Open Seats: 11 (as of 07-24-24 8:05 PM)
To check live space availability, Search for Courses.

Faculty

Emily Nyman
View Faculty Credentials
View Faculty Statement
Hiring Coordinator for this course: Dana Lee

General Education Requirements


This section meets the following CCV General Education Requirement(s) for the current catalog year:
VSCS Arts & Aesthetics
    Note
  1. Many degree programs have specific general education recommendations. In order to avoid taking unnecessary classes, please consult with additional resources like your program evaluation, your academic program catalog year page, and your academic advisor.
  2. Courses may only be used to meet one General Education Requirement.

Course Description

A survey of the history of Western music including the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic and contemporary periods. Through directed listening, students learn to distinguish styles and composers and discuss major historical developments.


Essential Objectives

1. Recognize and describe the fundamental elements of music: rhythm, melody, harmony and texture.
2. Distinguish among the many musical forms from simple phrases and theme to the more complicated sonata, concerto, and symphony.
3. Identify and discuss the different forms of composition typically used by composers (e.g., variation, counterpoint).
4. Identify and discuss the different forms of music and identify the major periods of music development from the medieval to the present.


Required Technology

More information on general computer and internet recommendations is available on the CCV IT Support page. https://support.ccv.edu/general/computer-recommendations/

Please see CCV's Digital Equity Statement (pg. 45) to learn more about CCV's commitment to supporting all students access the technology they need to successfully finish their courses.


Required Textbooks and Resources

This course uses one or more textbooks/books/simulations, along with free Open Educational Resources (OER) and/or library materials.

Fall 2024 textbook/book details will be available on 2024-05-20. On that date a link will be available below that will take you to eCampus, CCV's bookstore. The information provided there will be specific to this class. Please see this page for more information regarding the purchase of textbooks/books.

MUS-1010-VO01 Link to Textbooks for this course in eCampus.

For Open Educational Resources (OER) and/or library materials details, see the Canvas Site for this class.

The last day to use a Financial Aid Advance to purchase textbooks/books is the 3rd Tuesday of the semester. See your financial aid counselor at your academic center if you have any questions.


Methods

Each Week includes:

  • "Start Here" - Contains weekly reading and listening assignments, weekly posting timeline, lecture notes/outline, Forum A Reading Questions and Forum B Instructor Thought Questions/discussion topics.
  • Power Point presentation for clarification of new vocabulary and concepts from the reading/listening assignments.
  • Links to online resources related to the weekly topics to clarify and enrich learning.
  • Forum A gradebook rubric for specific and timely feedback from the instructor.
  • Forum B gradebook rubric for specific and timely feedback from the instructor.
  • Forum B discussion structure inclusive of opportunities for dialog between students and between students and instructor, with prompts for additional research into the weekly lesson topics.

Additionally, students reflect on their learning as they complete Units of study (Forum C). Reflection includes self-assessment of prior learning, connection with current/new learning, and identification of related topics of interest for further research.


Evaluation Criteria

Please Note:

Students must purchase the Digital Connect Online Access for Music: An Appreciation, Brief By KAMIEN.ISBN:9781264029709.

This specific version includes the ebook with embedded links to audio recordings essential for this course. Use the college online bookstore to be sure you get the right version. Upon purchase, you will receive instructions for where to go and how to access Connect.

If you decide to look elsewhere using just the isbn number, you may end up viewing several related products that are based on the textbook, but they may NOT be the versions that include access to the embedded audio links within the ebook.

This course requires purchase of Digital Connect Online Access so that you have full access to the ebook AND the audio recordings that are embedded in the textbook and outlined in the listening guides.

Our course will still take place in Canvas, but you will use the Connect site to read your ebook and listen to the recordings of the music we are studying.

Student learning will be assessed via:

  • answers to weekly questions about the reading (Forum A),
  • student-to-student and student-to-teacher feedback and discussion (Forum B),
  • Unit Wrap up/Reflection on Learning every 3-4 weeks (Forum C),
  • The Digital Connect Online Access text for Music: An Appreciation, Brief By KAMIEN. ISBN:9781264029709 is required.
  • There will be posting requirements specified each week. Adherence to the posting guidelines and schedule is imperative for successful completion of this course.

I chose this particular text/recordings set because it is comprehensive with an emphasis on enlightenment and enjoyment. In the author’s words, “A successful introductory music course is one that promotes a positive attitude toward music. Students should come away with a basic knowledge of the evolution of music, and with the aural ability to recognize specific forms, musical techniques, and historical styles. This text provides material for various approaches and different levels of rigor...The text is designed to develop the student’s listening abilities and to heighten his/her interest in music. It seeks to establish music as a lifelong source of pleasure, inspiration, and cultural enrichment.”

Class participation expectations: Since we don’t have a chance to meet face-to-face on a weekly basis, it is important to have an online format which ensures that we have a chance to communicate as a class regularly and have opportunities for meaningful exchange. Such a structure will also ensure that I can assess your learning continuously and accurately. Please plan to be part of the weekly discussion.

Posting Schedule:

  • By Friday midnight, students should have read the assigned text and posted their responses to the current week’s questions (Forum A – Weekly Reading Questions).
  • By Saturday midnight, students should answer the instructor thought question(s) (Forum B – Weekly Participation/Discussion) AND pose their own question related to the current lesson.
  • By Sunday midnight, students should answer another student's question (Forum B – Participation/Discussion).
  • By Monday midnight, students should respond to the instructor's additional comments or requests for additional information. By Monday midnight, the week closes.

Note: The posting schedule is in every week's "start here" and in the forum textbox, so you will have an easy reference to the posting schedule requirements.

Assessment Criteria:

Note: These criteria are in the weekly rubrics, so you will have easy reference to be sure you are meeting assignment requirements.

Grading Rubric Criteria and Points - Forum A Answers to the Reading Questions -
Comprehensive and accurate answers to all questions, clearly stated, detailed, with examples, no grammatical errors, posted on time earn full points (25).

Grading Rubric Criteria and Points - Forum B Discussion/Participation -

The B Forum requires a minimum of 4 specific types of posts. Total forum points = 25, accumulated as follows:
• A response to the instructor thought question that is comprehensive, accurate, detailed, with examples and correct grammar, posted on time earns full points (10).
• A student generated thought question that connects prior knowledge and experience to the current lesson and explains why the specific topic is personally important; prompts classmates to thinks and share beyond the weekly lesson content, posted on time earns full points (5).
• A student generated response to another student’s thought question that uses details and examples to illustrate and support assumptions, opinions, and new insights related to the question posed considering the weekly lesson and personal experience, posted on time earns full points (5).
• A student’s response to instructor request for additional information DURING the forum B dialog/discussion elaborates on perspective, provides examples, demonstrates more in-depth thought, and considerations for further research, posted on time earns full points (5).

Some weeks will also include Forum C assignments related to Unit Wrap up/Reflection on Learning.

Grading Rubric for Forum C (total points = 50), distributed as follows: Reflection on learning includes assessment of prior learning and new insights (30 points); Further research includes identification of interest, web based resources, and trivia challenge (10 points); Response to a classmate includes reference to their interest, connection with one's own interests and knowledge, and evidence of visiting the web-based resource (10 points).

Students lose 5 points a day for lateness; forums close at the end of the week.

Attendance - Weekly attendance is imperative to successfully complete this course. Missing more than 3 classes will result in a failing grade.

If you have any questions regarding these requirements, just ask.

Course Description Syllabus for Music Appreciation Fall 2024

Week I - Instructor/student introductions; Class format, text, resources;

Part I: Musical Elements. Introduction, Sound

Week 2 - Elements continued. Performing Media: Voices and Instruments

Week 3 – Elements continued. Rhythm, Music Notation, Melody, and Harmony

Week 4 - Elements completed. Key, Musical Texture, Musical Form, and Musical Style; Unit I Review/Reflection

Week 5 – Part II: The Middle Ages and Renaissance

Week 6 – Part III: The Baroque Period

Week 7 – Unit II/III Review/Reflection.

Week 8 - Part IV: Introduction to The Classical Period - The Classical Style (1750-1820) and Composer, Patron, and the Public in the Classical Period; Musical Forms of the Classical Period

Week 9 – The Classical Period completed. Classical Composers. Unit IV Review/Reflection.

Week 10 – Part V: The Romantic Period. Romanticism In Music (1820-1900), Romantic Composers And Their Public, and The Art Song

Week 11 – The Romantic Period continued. The Romantic Period Composers

Week 12 – The Romantic Period completed - Program Music, Nationalism In Nineteenth-Century Music, More Romantic Period Composers. Unit V Review/Reflection

Week 13 – Part VI: The 20thCentury and beyond. Musical Styles from 1900-1945, Music And Musicians In Society since 1900, Impressionism And Symbolism, Neoclassicism, Expressionism, and Music in America.

Week 14 – The 20th Century completed. Musical Styles Since 1945. Unit VI Review/Reflection.

Week 15 – Non-Western Music; Unit VII Review/Reflection.

Note: This is a topic/lesson outline based on the weekly reading assignments and discussion topics. Student learning will be assessed via answers to weekly questions about the reading, student-to-student and student-to-teacher discussion, and Unit Reviews/Reflections.


Grading Criteria

CCV Letter Grades as outlined in the Evaluation System Policy are assigned according to the following chart:

 HighLow
A+10098
A Less than 9893
A-Less than 9390
B+Less than 9088
B Less than 8883
B-Less than 8380
C+Less than 8078
C Less than 7873
C-Less than 7370
D+Less than 7068
D Less than 6863
D-Less than 6360
FLess than 60 
P10060
NPLess than 600


Weekly Schedule


Week/ModuleTopic  Readings  Assignments
 

1

See Week 1 "Start Here" for specific information; see the course description for a general topic list.

  

Week I - Instructor/student introductions; Class format, text, resources;

Part I: Musical Elements. Introduction, Sound

  

Introductions; Reading Questions; Discussion

 

2

See Week 2 "Start Here" for specific information; see the course description for a general topic list.

  

Elements continued. Performing Media: Voices and Instruments

  

Reading Questions; Discussion

 

3

See Week 3 "Start Here" for specific information; see the course description for a general topic list.

  

Elements continued. Rhythm, Music Notation, Melody, and Harmony

  

Reading Questions; Discussion

 

4

See Week 4 "Start Here" for specific information; see the course description for a general topic list.

  

Elements completed. Key, Musical Texture, Musical Form, and Musical Style; Unit I Review/Reflection

  

Reading Questions; Discussion; Unit Review/Reflection

 

5

See Week 5 "Start Here" for specific information; see the course description for a general topic list.

  

Part II: The Middle Ages and Renaissance

  

Reading Questions; Discussion

 

6

See Week 6 "Start Here" for specific information; see the course description for a general topic list.

  

Part III: The Baroque Period

  

Reading Questions; Discussion

 

7

See Week 7 "Start Here" for specific information; see the course description for a general topic list.

  

Unit II/III Unit Review/Reflection.

  

Unit Review/Reflection.

 

8

See Week 8 "Start Here" for specific information; see the course description for a general topic list.

  

Part IV: Introduction to The Classical Period - The Classical Style (1750-1820) and Composer, Patron, and the Public in the Classical Period; Musical Forms of the Classical Period

  

Reading Questions; Discussion

 

9

See Week 9 "Start Here" for specific information; see the course description for a general topic list.

  

The Classical Period completed. Classical Composers. Unit IV Review/Reflection.

  

Reading Questions; Discussion. Unit Review/Reflection.

 

10

See Week 10 "Start Here" for specific information; see the course description for a general topic list.

  

Part V: The Romantic Period. Romanticism In Music (1820-1900), Romantic Composers And Their Public, and The Art Song

  

Reading Questions; Discussion

 

11

See Week 11 "Start Here" for specific information; see the course description for a general topic list.

  

The Romantic Period continued. The Romantic Period Composers

  

Reading Questions; Discussion

 

12

See Week 12 "Start Here" for specific information; see the course description for a general topic list.

  

The Romantic Period completed - Program Music, Nationalism In Nineteenth-Century Music, More Romantic Period Composers. Unit V Review/Reflection

  

Reading Questions; Discussion; Unit Review/Reflection

 

13

See Week 13 "Start Here" for specific information; see the course description for a general topic list.

  

Part VI: The 20thCentury and beyond. Musical Styles from 1900-1945, Music And Musicians In Society since 1900, Impressionism And Symbolism, Neoclassicism, Expressionism, and Music in America.

  

Reading Questions; Discussion

 

14

See Week 14 "Start Here" for specific information; see the course description for a general topic list.

  

The 20th Century completed. Musical Styles Since 1945. Unit VI Reviw/Reflection.

  

Reading Questions; Discussion. Unit Review/Reflection.

 

15

See Week 15 "Start Here" for specific information; see the course description for a general topic list.

  

Non-Western Music; Unit VII Review/Reflection.

  

Reading Questions; Discussion; Unit Review/Reflection.

 

Attendance Policy

Regular attendance and participation in classes are essential for success in and are completion requirements for courses at CCV. A student's failure to meet attendance requirements as specified in course descriptions will normally result in a non-satisfactory grade.

  • In general, missing more than 20% of a course due to absences, lateness or early departures may jeopardize a student's ability to earn a satisfactory final grade.
  • Attending an on-ground or synchronous course means a student appeared in the live classroom for at least a meaningful portion of a given class meeting. Attending an online course means a student posted a discussion forum response, completed a quiz or attempted some other academically required activity. Simply viewing a course item or module does not count as attendance.
  • Meeting the minimum attendance requirement for a course does not mean a student has satisfied the academic requirements for participation, which require students to go above and beyond simply attending a portion of the class. Faculty members will individually determine what constitutes participation in each course they teach and explain in their course descriptions how participation factors into a student's final grade.

Accessibility Services for Students with Disabilities:


CCV strives to mitigate barriers to course access for students with documented disabilities. To request accommodations, please
  1. Provide disability documentation to the Accessibility Coordinator at your academic center. https://ccv.edu/discover-resources/students-with-disabilities/
  2. Request an appointment to meet with accessibility coordinator to discuss your request and create an accommodation plan.
  3. Once created, students will share the accommodation plan with faculty. Please note, faculty cannot make disability accommodations outside of this process.


Academic Integrity


CCV has a commitment to honesty and excellence in academic work and expects the same from all students. Academic dishonesty, or cheating, can occur whenever you present -as your own work- something that you did not do. You can also be guilty of cheating if you help someone else cheat. Being unaware of what constitutes academic dishonesty (such as knowing what plagiarism is) does not absolve a student of the responsibility to be honest in his/her academic work. Academic dishonesty is taken very seriously and may lead to dismissal from the College.