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Web Schedule Spring 2017


Revision Date: 14-Jan-17

MET-1020-VY01V - Meteorology


Synonym: 154534
Location: St. Johnsbury
Credits: 3 (45 hours)
Day/Times: Monday, 06:00P - 08:45P
Semester Dates: 01-23-2017 to 05-01-2017
Last day to drop without a grade: 02-12-2017
Last day to withdraw (W grade): 03-26-2017
Faculty: Mark Breen | View Faculty Credentials

This course has started, please contact the offering academic center about registration

Comments: Telepresence course. This interactive, videoconference course is taught from CCV St. Johnsbury and is available to students at CCV St. Albans.

Browse the Moodle Site for this class.

Course Description:

An introductory course that investigates how the atmosphere interacts with solar energy to create dynamic weather systems. Applies basic meteorological and climatic principles to the study of local, regional and global weather patterns. Includes a discussion of global climate patterns. Prerequisite: Basic Algebra.

Essential Objectives:

1. Discuss the factors that drive the global weather system.
2. Understand and apply the scientific vocabulary, methods, and principles involved in the field of meteorology.
3. Read a weather map and interpret its symbols correctly.
4. Use satellite data for weather prediction as available on the Internet.
5. Explain meteorological principles as related to water movement through the atmosphere and surface air pressure changes.
6. Describe the characteristics of thunderstorms, tornadoes, hurricanes, cloud types and related weather patterns.
7. Predict the weather for a few days forward based on meteorological principles.
8. Discuss the impact of global climate patterns on air pollutants and dispersions.
9. Identify the various atmospheric layers and their properties.
10. Describe the natural causes of climate change, the human impact on global climate, and the possible consequences of global warming.
11. Demonstrate proficiency in understanding, interpreting, evaluating, and applying quantitative data and information.

Methods:

  • Small-group and whole-class discussion

  • Mini-lecture

  • visit the Eye on the Sky weather center at the Fairbanks Museum

  • hands-on activities, including plotting and analyzing weather maps, presenting a dsicussion of the current weather, creating actual weather forecasts

  • weekly learning evaluations (quizzes) 

  • three exams (including final exam)

Evaluation Criteria:

 

 

  • 15% Participation
  • 15% Homework assignments
  • 30% quizzes
  • 40% exams

 

 

Grading Criteria:

A+ through A-:  =90% or greater; for written work, it must clearly demonstrate full understanding of the topic or issues addressed, but it must also provide a critical analysis of these.

B+ through B-:  =80-89%;  it must demonstrate strong originality, comprehension, critical thinking, and attention to detail.

C+ through C-:  =70-79%;  it must meet the expectations of the assignment, and demonstrate solid comprehension, critical thinking, and attention to detail.

D+ through D-: =60-69%; it must marginally meet the expectations of the assignment, and demonstrate minimal comprehension, critical thinking, and attention to detail.

F: =59% or less; does not meet the expectations or objectives of the assignment, and demonstrates consistent problems with comprehension, organization, critical thinking, and supporting details. In addition, ***Students are strongly urged to discuss this grade with their instructor and advisor.***

P: Equivalent to D (+/-) or better and therefore course will not count as credit for specific program requirements or competence area requirements.

NP: indicates failure to meet course objectives and/or failure to meet grading criteria for successful completion as described in the instructor's course description.

Textbooks:

Spring 2017 textbook data will be available on December 1.

Visualizing Weather and Climate, ISBN: 9780470418123, John Wiley & Sons Inc   $96.00

Additional Options: Used: |

Attendance Policy:

Regular attendance and participation in classes are essential components of a student's success in college and are completion requirements for courses at CCV. Please be aware that missing more than three (3) classes will result in a non-satisfactory grade. A pattern of late arrival or early departure will constitute absence at the instructor's discretion.

Contact Faculty:

Email: Mark Breen
Hiring Coordinator for this course: Jennifer Gundy

Mailing Address:
60 Caledonia St
Saint Johnsbury, VT 05819

Syllabus:


V17SP Meteorology (MET-1020-VY01V and VA01V)

Spring Semester 2017

 

Week 1 January 23

Chapter 1 - Introducing Weather and Climate

“If you have March in January, you’ll have January in March”

Weather - Climate - Standard Measurements in Weather and Climate:  how we record Temperature, Winds, Pressure, Precipitation, Humidity, Sky Condition, etc..

Assignments include:

1. Read and study Chapter 1. 

2. Student presentation of the weather.  Each week, one or more students will present a discussion of the weather, including, but not limited to, either the current or recent weather, and any relevant weather topics.

3. Review the summary at the end of the chapter, and select ONE of the Critical and Creative Thinking Questions, and bring in a one-page answer to one of those questions next week.

 

Week 2  January 30

Chapter 2 - The Earth's Atmosphere

“Big bubble, no trouble”

Composition of the atmosphere, temperature structure of the atmosphere, atmospheric pressure and density

1. Read and Study Chapter 2 in the textbook.

2. Student presentation of the weather.  

3. Review the Summary at the end of the Chapter, and look up the answers to the Self-Test on page 49.  I will give you a chapter 2 QUIZ NEXT WEEK that is IDENTICAL to this Self-Test.

 Week 3  February 6

 

Chapter 3 - The Earth's Global Energy Balance

“The chill is on, from near and far, in every month that has an “R””

Electromagnetic radiation, geographic variations in energy flow, the global energy system

1. Read and Study Chapter 3 in the textbook.

2. Student presentation of the weather.  

3. Review the Summary, and be prepared for the QUIZ that includes items from the Chapter 3 Self-Test.

 

Week 4  February 13

Chapter 4 - Surface Temperature and its Variation

“As the days lengthen, the cold strengthens”

The earth's rotation and orbit, air temperature, the daily cycle of air temperature, the annual cycle of air temperature, measurement of air temperature

1. Read and Study Chapter 4 in the textbook.

2. Student presentation of the weather.  

3. Review the Summary, which includes a self-test, videos, and chapter quiz. Be prepared for the Self-Test which will be given to you next week, with a few added questions.

 

Week 5  February 20

Chapter 5 - Atmospheric Moisture

“Rain (or snow) before seven, done by eleven”

Atmospheric moisture and precipitation, humidity, the adiabatic process, clouds, precipitation

1. Read and Study Chapter 5 in the textbook.

2. Student presentation of the weather.  

3. Review the Summary, which includes a self-test, videos, and chapter quiz. There will be a Quiz on Chapter 5, taken from the whole chapter, next week.

 

Week 6  February 27

Chapter 6 -  Winds

“When the wind is from the north and west, that’s when the sugaring is the best”

Measurement of wind, wind and pressure gradients, the Coriolis effect and winds aloft, winds at the surface…

1. Read and Study Chapter 6 in the textbook.

2. Student presentation of the weather.  

3. Review the Summary, which includes a self-test, and Moodle videos (if any).

 

Week 7 March 6

Chapter 7 - Global Atmospheric and Oceanic Circulation

“March comes in like a lion, and goes out like a lamb”

Surface winds, winds aloft, temperature layers of the oceans, surface currents, heat and moisture transport            

1. Read and Study Chapter 7 in the textbook.

2. Student presentation of the weather.  

3. Review the Summary, which includes a self-test.

 MID TERM EXAM-Chapters 1 through 7  (You will select Open/Closed book for Mid-Term or Final, with the reciprocal applying to the other major exam:  one open, one closed.)

 

Week 8 March 13

Chapter 8 – Mid-Latitude Weather Systems

“Red at night, a sailor’s delight.  Red in the morning, sailors take warning”

Air masses, cold, warm, and occluded fronts, mid-latitude anticyclones and cyclones, mid-latitude cyclones and upper-air disturbances       

1. Read and Study Chapter 8 in the textbook.

2. Student presentation of the weather.  

3. Review the Summary, which includes a self-test, videos on the Moodle (if available), and chapter quiz.

 

Week 9  March 20

Chapter 9 - Tropical Weather Systems

“June, too soon.  July, stand by.  August, look out, you must.  September, remember.  October, all over.” 

Tropical weather systems, development and movement of tropical cyclones, impscts of tropical cyclones        

1. Read and Study Chapter 9 in the textbook.

2. Student presentation of the weather.  

3. Review the Summary, which includes a self-test, videos, and chapter quiz.

 

 Week 10 March 27

Chapter 10 - Thunderstorms and Tornadoes

“When ditch and pond affect the nose, look out for rain and stormy blows”

 Air-mass thunderstorms, mesoscale convective systems, thunder and lightning, charge separation, tornado characteristics and development, tornado forecasting    

1. Read and Study Chapter 10 in the textbook.

2. Student presentation of the weather.  

3. Review the Summary, which includes a self-test, videos, and chapter quiz.

 

Week 11 April 3

Chapter 11  - Global Scope of Climate

“Long foretold, long will last, quick and fast, it will not last”

Factors controlling climate, temperature and precipitation regimes, climate classification      

1. Read and Study Chapter 11 in the textbook.

2. Student presentation of the weather.  

3. Review the Summary, which includes a self-test, videos, and chapter quiz.  

 

Week 12  April 10

Chapter 12 - Climates of the World

“When the oak comes before the ash, the summer will be a splash,

When the ash comes before the oak, the summer will be a soak”

Low-latitude climates, mid-latitude climates, high-latitude climates    

1. Read and Study Chapter 12 in the textbook.

2. Student presentation of the weather.  

3.  Review the Summary, which includes a self-test and any videos (if posted on MOODLE). 

 

Week 13 April 17

Chapter 13 - Climate Variability

“All signs fail in flood and drought”

Annual to centennial climate variations, historical record, millennial climate variations, climate feedbacks    

1. Read and Study Chapter 13 in the textbook.

2. Student presentation of the weather.  

3. Review the Summary, which includes a self-test, videos, and chapter overview.

 

 Chapter 14 - Human Interaction with Weather and Climate

“When salt sticks in the shaker, it favors the umbrella maker”

Severe weather, severe climate, human impact on weather and climate

1. Read and Study Chapter 14 in the textbook.

2. Student presentation of the weather.  

3. Review the Summary, which includes videos and chapter overview.

 

Week 14  April 24

“When the first snow whitens the mountain tops, 6 weeks later you will see your first snowfall”

 Chapter 15 - Weather Forecasting and Numerical Modeling 

Local and synoptic weather forecasting, numerical weather forecasting, operational weather forecasting

 Chapter 16 - Human-Induced Climate Change and Climate Forecasting

Greenhouse gases, numerical modeling, climate-change predictions  

1. Read and Study Chapters 15 & 16 in the textbook.

2. Student presentation of the weather.  

3. Review the Summary, which includes a self-test, videos, and chapter overview.

 

 

Week 15 May 1

“Some are weather-wise.  The rest are otherwise” – B. Franklin

 FINAL EXAM-Questions come from ALL the quizzes you have taken, plus additional questions from Chapter 14, 15 and 16 which we discussed.

 

Please note: In order to receive accommodations for disabilities in this course, students must make an appointment to see the Americans with Disabilities Coordinator in their site and bring documentation with them.

Academic Honesty: CCV has a commitment to honesty and excellence in academic work and expects the same from all students. Academic dishonesty, or cheating, can occur whenever you present -as your own work- something that you did not do. You can also be guilty of cheating if you help someone else cheat. Being unaware of what constitutes academic dishonesty (such as knowing what plagiarism is) does not absolve a student of the responsibility to be honest in his/her academic work. Academic dishonesty is taken very seriously and may lead to dismissal from the College.

Course description details subject to change. Please refer to this document frequently.

To check on space availability, choose Search for Classes.


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