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Revision Date: 26-Apr-20

INT-1050-VU03 - Dimensions of Self & Society


Online Class


Online courses take place 100% online via Canvas, without required in-person or Zoom meetings.


Synonym: 185018

Location: Winooski - Meets Online

Credits: 3 (45 hours)
Day/Times: Meets online
Semester Dates: 05-26-2020 to 08-17-2020
Last day to drop without a grade: 06-11-2020 - Refund Policy
Last day to withdraw (W grade): 07-14-2020 - Refund Policy
Faculty: Daniel Aguek | View Faculty Credentials
This course has started, please contact the offering academic center about registration
This section meets the following General Education Requirement(s):
1st Year Seminar
    Note
  1. Many degree programs have specific general education recommendations. In order to avoid taking unnecessary classes, please consult with additional resources like your program evaluation, your academic program page, and your academic advisor.
  2. Courses may only be used to meet one General Education Requirement.

Browse the Canvas Site for this class.

Course Description:

In this interdisciplinary first-semester seminar, students make the transition to college-level academic culture. This seminar is designed to help students develop the learning skills and habits of success that will support them throughout their college experience and as they consider career pathways. Reading, writing, and discussion (both in class and online) are central to developing an understanding of academic and societal responsibility. Students will start by analyzing personal beliefs and styles of thinking and then begin to look at how others and society view core concepts such as power, dissent, alienation, oppression, and freedom.

Essential Objectives:

1. Interpret, analyze, and evaluate a text and its sources.
2. Demonstrate foundational information literacy, research skills, and academic honesty necessary for academic writing.
3. Demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills in both online and classroom settings.
4. Apply effective strategies for building new knowledge and skills through reflection on learning preferences, challenges, and goals.
5. Identify possible career goals and educational pathways.
6. Examine social issues through the lens of the individual and society.
7. Examine personal assumptions and biases, and ethical impacts of decision making and participation in society.
8. Consider issues from multiple perspectives and discuss, debate, and defend ideas with clarity and reason.

Methods:

Dimensions of Self and Society is a humanity based first semester anthology for incoming college students. The teaching style is to be done mostly by discussions with opportunity for all students to share their perspectives with each other and with the instructor. The instructor will play the role of a discussion facilitator ask clarifying questions and redirecting the discussions back to the issues relevant for that week assigned readings and current event relevant to the course learning goals and objectives. The instructor will always wrap up the class with closing remarks mostly focusing on the lessons learned during that week and reminding students on the assigned readings and due tasks for the weeks to follow. There will always be opportunity for class activities and feedbacks for a given class so that the instructor can change or keep teaching styles to meet the needs of students.

Evaluation Criteria:

The grading will be based on student’s attendance and participation, home works, and final project. The student must read the learning objectives and course syllabus. Every aspect of student's will be factored into final course grade at the end of the semester.

Final grade points breakdown:

· 15% Attendance

· 10% Participation

· 35% Homework and Short Written Assignments

· 15% Mid Term Paper

· 25% Final Project [Paper and Presentation]

Grading Criteria and Rubric:

Oral Communication and Writing Skills

(1) Oral Communication Rubric (Presentation and class participation)

Exemplary (4 Score – Grade A)

· Presenter follows logical sequence and provides explanations and/or elaboration

· Presenter seldom returns to notes, maintaining eye contact with audience throughout the presentation

· Presenter speaks clearly and loud enough for all in the audience to hear, makes no grammatical errors, and pronounces all terms correctly and precisely

Good (3 Score – Grade B)

· Presenter follows logical sequence, but fails to elaborate

· Presenter maintains eye contact with audience most of the time, but frequently returns to notes

· Presenter speaks clearly and loud enough to be heard by most in the audience, makes relatively few grammatical errors, and pronounces most terms correctly

Fair (2 Score – Grade C)

· Presenter does not follow logical sequence (jumps around)

· Presenter reads most of the report, but occasionally makes eye contact with the audience

· Presenter’s voice is relatively clear, but too low to be heard by those in the back of the room. Presenter makes several major grammatical errors, and mispronounces some terms

Poor (1 Score – Grade D)

· There is no logical sequence of information

· Presenter reads entire report, making no eye contact with audience

· Presenter mumbles, mispronounces terms, and makes serious and persistent grammatical errors throughout the presentation. Presenter speaks too quietly to be heard by many in the audience

Let’s Not Even Go There (0 Score – Grade F)

· Presenter has not done the work and is completely out of touch with the topic

(2) Writing Skills Rubric (Short Essay and Final Project)

W0W!!! (90-100 Points - Grade A)

  • Begins with an introduction that shows your understanding of the issues, grabs your readers’ attention, and presents a strong and insightful thesis or point of view.
  • Engages the topic in a thoughtful and individual way, showing originality, elegance and clear thinking.
  • Develops the topic using a strong detail, quotes from other sources, and a unique synthesis of ideas.
  • Utilizes library research and quotes from outside sources, always properly citing them using the MLA format.
  • Possesses a fully explained and logical progression of ideas that indicates the writer’s sensitivity to different ways of looking at the topic with an awareness of key counter arguments and a consideration of how those alternate positions shape your understanding of the topic.
  • Ends with a strong conclusion that clarifies the significance of the paper’s lessons
  • Chooses words aptly and sometimes inventively.
  • Demonstrates mastery of most of the grammar and usage conventions of Standard English.
  • Uses phrasing, tone, and expression that reflects a unique personal voice.

Good! Almost There (80-89 Points - Grade B)

  • Begins with an introduction that shows some understanding of the issues, gives some background and has an adequate thesis or point of view.
  • Presents a thoughtful response to the topic, using appropriate reasoning and a partially realized analysis that is accurate.
  • Develops the topic showing appropriate details, a sense of orderly progress between ideas, and use of references that reveal a familiarity with the topic.
  • Uses words precisely if not creatively.
  • Varies sentence structure enough to read smoothly.
  • Utilizes library research and quotes from outside sources, usually properly citing them using the MLA format.
  • Uses competently the conventions of written English, containing few, if any, errors in sentence structure, punctuation and capitalization or usage.
  • Uses mostly consistent phrasing, tone and expression that reflect a personal world view and style.

Getting there(70-79 Points - Grade C)

  • Presents an adequate response to the topic, using superficial analysis and weak point of view.
  • Uses logical reasoning, but the supporting evidence is general and imprecise with few examples. There may be some small factual errors.
  • Uses a less precise vocabulary and may contain awkwardness of expression.
  • Utilizes library research and quotes from outside sources, with fairly consistent use of the MLA citation format. May make some errors.
  • Contains minor errors in mechanics and usage, and perhaps one or two more distracting errors in sentence structure.
  • Uses fairly consistent phrasing, tone and expression that reflect a personal world view and style with occasional inconsistencies.

Try Again (60-69 Points - Grade D)

  • Responds to the topic illogically, without a coherent structure or focus.
  • Has no point of view, uses mostly summary and lacks evidence and support.
  • Makes several large, factual errors.
  • Makes enough errors in usage and sentence structure to cause a reader serious, if occasional, distraction.
  • Improperly uses the MLA format for citations. Makes major errors in quoting and uses few sources.
  • Uses frequently inconsistent phrasing, tone and expression, often formulaic and imitative; lacks evidence of a personal worldview and style.

Let’s not even go there (50-59 Points - Grade F)

  • Doesn’t attempt the task or distorts it
  • Lacks organization or detail.
  • Contains many distracting errors in sentence structure, simplistic or inaccurate word choice, many repeated errors in grammar and usage.
  • Not enough is written to get a sense of personal worldview and style.

Attendance Policy Guideline: The instructor will strictly follow CCV attendance policy laid out in student handbook and will grade students on the basis of what is spelled out in student handbook. Exceptions will be done case by case basis as deemed appropriate given each student’s extenuating circumstances. But those exceptions must fall within the parameters allowed by CCV attendance policy.

Class discussions, homework, and term paper submission Policy: The goal of class discussions is for all participants to learn from each other as pertains to assigned readings and personal life experiences. Class discussions must be done in a respectful manner. Students should respectfully disagree on the issues being discussed. It is okay to give opinion outside of assigned readings but the contributions must be done in a manner that helps others learn from the ideas being contributed. Class contribution points are awarded based on how familiar the contributor is with the assigned readings for the week and also on how relevant their own personal opinions is to the learning goals of the dimensions of self and society.

The written assignments and homework must be received by the instructor on the due date in order for student to get full score for those assignments. Any issue that may prevent student to submit the assignment by the due date must be conveyed to the instructor before the due so that appropriate arrangements are made for later date submissions. Any delayed assignment can be graded by the instructor with reduced points ranging from partial credits to failing grade.

Final Project guideline: The final term project is due on the day of the last class meeting for this semester. Student will be asked to pick their topics on the list of the current event issues that interest them in the second week of the semester. Students will also be given the outline of the term paper expectations including the required research and length of the written work. Student will submit in writing their chosen topics by the third week of the semester due by the class meeting day. Students will work with the instructor during the course of the semester as students make progress on their term papers. Each student will be given 10 minute slot on the last class meeting to present on the findings and recommendations from their research projects.

Small Group Discussions and Presentation Expectations: During the course of the semester, the instructor will give out a small reading for discussions in small groups and each group will present to the rest of the class. The chosen reading could be a newspaper article, excerpt on other readings deemed relevant to the assigned course readings for the week by the instructor. It should be a short reading worthy of 30 minute discussions and another 30 presentations. It will be sent to students ahead of time so that students can prepare to discuss and present to their classmates during that week class meeting.

Teaching and structure policy: Dimensions of Self and Society is a humanity based first semester anthology for incoming college students. The teaching style is to be done mostly by discussions with opportunity for all students to share their perspectives with each other and with the instructor. The instructor will play the role of a discussion facilitator ask clarifying questions and redirecting the discussions back to the issues relevant for that week assigned readings and current event relevant to the course learning goals and objectives. The instructor will always wrap up the class with closing remarks mostly focusing on the lessons learned during that week and reminding students on the assigned readings and due tasks for the weeks to follow. There will always be opportunity for class activities and feedbacks for a given class so that the instructor can change or keep teaching styles to meet the needs of students.

Textbooks:

Summer 2020 textbook data will be available on April 6. On that date a link will be available below that will take you to eCampus, CCV's bookstore. The information provided there will be for this course only. Please see this page for more information regarding the purchase of textbooks.

INT-1050-VU03 Textbooks.

The last day to use a Financial Aid advance to purchase textbooks is the 3rd Tuesday of the semester. See your financial aid counselor at your academic center if you have any questions.

Contact Faculty:

Email: Daniel Aguek
Hiring Coordinator for this course: Ashraf Alamatouri

Syllabus:

Syllabus outline (Week by Week):

Week 1 – 3 Discovery of Self: Journals/Memoirs/First-Person Accounts

Week 1 – Introductions, Course overview, Expectations, navigating Moodle and electronic learning resources, and introductory dimensions assigned readings

May 26th: Lesson One [Introductions, Course overview, Expectations, navigating Moodle and electronic learning resources, How to Succeed as a College Student]

v Online: Introductions and Icebreakers

v Online: Course Overview and Expectations

v Online: Discussion of Dimensions Reading Section One [p. xii - 8]

Ø Purpose of Dimensions of Self and Society (p. xii)

Ø Technology and Moodle at CCV (p. xiv)

Ø Learning to Read and Write (p. 3)

Ø The Library Card (p. 8)

v In Class: Information Literature: Use TILT library to explore electronic resources

Ø Hart Library resources for students

Ø Search of information and its sources

v In Class: Take away from the assigned dimensions readings and wrap up by instructor on all materials covered for the first week of classes and handouts.

Week 2 – Discovery of Self: Journals/Memoirs/First-Person Accounts

June 2nd: Lesson Two: Self-discovery through first person accounts uncovering the societal challenges the authors live through in their own societies (Beginning)

v Before Class: Complete the Selected Dimensions Reading from Section One [p. 17 – 35]

Ø Introduction: Obvious Questions Don’t Have Obvious Answers (p. 17)

Ø At Last I Kill a Buffalo (p. 23)

Ø Indian Education (p. 29)

Ø Graduation (p. 35)

v Online: Video Clip: Jonathan Murad’s Harvard Commencement Speech.

Online: Full class discussions on assigned readings and video documentary.

Week 3 – Discovery of Self: Journals/Memoirs/First-Person Accounts

June 9th: Lesson Three [Self Discovery through first person accounts Uncovering the societal challenges the authors live through in Their Own Societies, Continued]

v Before Class: Complete Discussions of the Selected Dimensions Reading from Section Two [p. 46 – 77]

Ø The Scholarship Jacket (p. 46)

Ø The Sacredness of Shores (p. 51)

Ø Without a Net (p. 57)

Ø Shame (p. 66)

Ø Malala’s Speech to the UN (p. 77)

v Online: Video Clip [Documentary on Malala’s story and girls education]

v Online: Full class discussions on assigned readings and video documentary.

Week 4 – 8 Text and Context: Poetry and Drama, Short Fiction/Non-Fiction [Students’ Exposure to Various Perspectives, Styles, and Sources on a Given Topic – [An interpretive eye on finding the truth which is not always saliently discernible from complex reading sources]

Week 4 – June 16th: Lesson Four: Poetry and Drama [Students’ Exposure to Various Perspectives, Styles, and Sources on a Given Topic, Beginning]

v Before Class: Complete the Selected Dimensions Readings from Section Two– Poetry and Drama

Ø Jorge the Church Janitor Finally Quits (p. 83)

Ø What Work Is (p. 85)

Ø The History Teacher (p. 87)

Ø Book (p. 88)

Ø Kindness (p. 90)

v In Class: Approaches to Reading, Study Skills, Introduction to TILT.

v Online: Video Clip: Jimmy Tingle’s Harvard Commencement Speech.

v Online: Full class discussions on assigned readings and video documentary watched in class.

Week 5 – June 23rd: Lesson Five: Poetry and Drama [Students’ Exposure to Various Perspectives, Styles, and Sources on a Given Topic, Continued]

v Before Class: Complete the Selected Dimensions Readings from Section Two – Poetry and Drama

Ø Let America Be America Again (p. 90)

Ø I Hear America Singing (p. 92)

Ø Prospective Immigrants Please Note (p. 96)

Ø To Be of Use (p. 97)

Ø My Name Is Not “Those People” (p. 98)

Ø The Journey (p. 100)

v Online: Full class discussions on assigned readings and video documentary watched in class.

Week 6 – June 30th: Lesson Six: The Short Fiction [Students’ Exposure to Various Perspectives, Styles, and Sources on a Given Topic, Wrap Up]

v Before Class: Complete Readings from Section Three – The Short Fiction

Ø The Story of an Hour (p. 127)

Ø The Happies Man on Earth (p. 130)

Ø I stand Here Ironing (p. 140)

Ø Shooting An Elephant (p. 148)

Ø I used to Live Here Once (p. 155)

v Online: Full class discussions on assigned readings and video documentary watched in class.

Week 7 – July 7th: Lesson Seven: The Short Fiction [Students’ Exposure to Various Perspectives, Styles, and Sources on a Given Topic, Continued]

v Before class: Complete Readings from Section Three – The Short Fiction

Ø A & P (p. 157)

Ø Everyday Use (p. 163)

Ø Revelation (p. 172)

Ø Hell-Heaven (p. 187)

Ø The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas (p. 204)

Ø The Lottery (p. 210)

v Online: Full class discussions on the assigned readings.

Week 8 – July 14th: Lesson Eight: The Essays and Nonfiction [Students’ Exposure to Various Perspectives, Styles, and Sources on a Given Topic, Continued]

v Before class: Complete Selected Dimensions Readings from Section Four – Essays and Nonfiction:

o Living Within and Without the Rules (p. 221)

o White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack (p. 245)

o The Way Forward: Another World Is Possible (p. 251)

o Where Sweatshops Are a Dream (p. 275)

o Work (p. 278)

o What Happened to the Old Protestant Work Ethic? (p. 284)

o The Hacker Work Ethic (p. 293)

o Leisure and Consumption (p. 302)

o Cuss Time (p. 315)

o Coddling of the American Mind (p. 319)

v Online: Full class discussions on assigned readings and video documentary watched in class.

Week 9 – July 21st: Lesson Nine The Essays and Nonfiction [Students’ Exposure to Various Perspectives, Styles, and Sources on a Given Topic, Continued]

v Before class: Complete the Selected Dimensions Reading from Section Four – Essays and Nonfiction:

o Thank You for Your Service (p. 337)

o The Gettysburg Address (p. 349)

o From Walden: Conclusion (p. 350)

o Cheerful Robots (p. 357)

o Return to Hayneville (p. 349)

o End Paper: of My Friend Hector and My Achilles Heel (p. 372)

o The Spectacle of Waste (p. 375)

o The 10,000-Hour Rule (p. 389)

o Why Looks Are the Last Bastion of Discrimination (p. 410)

v Online: Full class discussions on assigned readings and video documentary watched in class.

Week 9 The Allegory of the Cave: Plato’s The Allegory of the Cave

Week 9– July 21st: Lesson Nine [The Allegory of the Cave: Plato’s The Allegory of the Cave, Dimensions Reader, p. 417 - 423]

v Before Class: Read Plato’s The Allegory of the Cave, Dimensions Reader, p. 417 – 423

v Online: Full class discussions of The Allegory of the Cave

Week 10 - Challenges: Complex Case Studies, Problems, Social Issues [political and socio-economic freedom is covered in these case studies]

Week 10 – July 28th: Lesson Ten - Challenges: Rwanda and Darfur Genocide - Ethnic, political freedom, human rights, and social justice cases

Assigned Readings:

v Before class: “Letter From Rwanda: After the Genocide When a people murders up to a million fellow-countrymen, what does it mean to survive?” Philip Gourevitch, December 18, 1995, The New Yorker.

v Before class: “ Bystanders to Genocide,” Power, Samantha, September 2001 Issue/Global, The Atlantic

v Online: Full class discussions on assigned readings in class.

Week 10 – July 28th: Lesson Ten [Challenges: Refugee Crisis, Human Trafficking, Immigration Reform and Undocumented Workers, Sweatshops and Child Labor case studies

v Before class: Read “Europe’s Immigration Crisis is Just Beginning,” Max Ehrenfruend, July 1, 2016, The Washington Post

v In class: Immigration & Undocumented Workers: Read CBS Coverage Linked Here

v In class: Human Trafficking: Watch CNN Documentary Linked Here

v In class: Sweatshops and Child Labor Documentary Linked Here

v In Class: Full class discussions on assigned readings and video documentary watched in class.

Week 11 – 12 Commitment: Extended Work of Nonfiction [Economic freedom and good citizenship is covered in this nonfiction]

Week 11 – August 4th: Lesson Eleven [Extended Work of Nonfiction, Beginning]

v Before class: What They Meant for Evil by Rebecca Deng et al, 2019 (Part I and II, p. 3 – 103): Read the assigned pages in preparation for class discussions.

v Online: Full class online discussions on assigned reading.

Week 11 – August 12th: Lesson Eleven [Extended Work of Nonfiction, Ending],

v Before class: What They Meant for Evil by Rebecca Deng et al, 2019 (Part III and IV, p. 107 – 205): Read the assigned pages in preparation for class discussions..

v Online: Online: Full class online discussions on assigned reading.

Week 12 – August 17th: Lesson Twelve [Final Project Presentation and Semester Wraps]

v Before class: What They Meant for Evil by Rebecca Deng et al, 2019 (Part V, p. 209 – 277): Read the assigned pages in preparation for class discussions..

v Online: Student discussions on the assigned readings.

v Online: Final Project submissions.

Accessibility Services for Students with Disabilities: CCV strives to mitigate barriers to course access for students with documented disabilities. To request accommodations, please

  1. Provide disability documentation to the Accessibility Coordinator at your academic center. https://ccv.edu/discover-resources/students-with-disabilities/
  2. Request an appointment to meet with accessibility coordinator to discuss your request and create an accommodation plan.
  3. Once created, students will share the accommodation plan with faculty. Please note, faculty cannot make disability accommodations outside of this process.

Academic Honesty: CCV has a commitment to honesty and excellence in academic work and expects the same from all students. Academic dishonesty, or cheating, can occur whenever you present -as your own work- something that you did not do. You can also be guilty of cheating if you help someone else cheat. Being unaware of what constitutes academic dishonesty (such as knowing what plagiarism is) does not absolve a student of the responsibility to be honest in his/her academic work. Academic dishonesty is taken very seriously and may lead to dismissal from the College.

Course description details subject to change. Please refer to this document frequently.

To check on space availability, choose Search for Classes.


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