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Essential Objectives

Course Syllabus


Revision Date: 02-Jul-24
 

Fall 2024 | HUM-2040-VO01 - The Holocaust


Online Class

Online courses take place 100% online via Canvas, without required in-person or Zoom meetings.

Location: Online
Credits: 3 (45 hours)
Day/Times: Meets online
Semester Dates: 09-03-2024 to 12-16-2024
Last day to drop without a grade: 09-16-2024 - Refund Policy
Last day to withdraw (W grade): 11-04-2024 - Refund Policy
Open Seats: 8 (as of 07-21-24 4:05 PM)
To check live space availability, Search for Courses.

Faculty

Nancy Thompson
View Faculty Credentials
View Faculty Statement
Hiring Coordinator for this course: Jennifer Gundy

General Education Requirements


This section meets the following CCV General Education Requirement(s) for the current catalog year:
VSCS Humanistic Perspectives
    Note
  1. Many degree programs have specific general education recommendations. In order to avoid taking unnecessary classes, please consult with additional resources like your program evaluation, your academic program catalog year page, and your academic advisor.
  2. Courses may only be used to meet one General Education Requirement.

Course Description

An exploration of the Holocaust from historical, political, moral, and religious perspectives. Students use historical documents, film, literature, and art to explore various dimensions of this watershed event in Western civilization.


Essential Objectives

1. Examine major historical developments leading to the rise of Hitler and the major events contributing to the occurrence of the Holocaust.
2. Articulate the key ideas of National Socialism, Fascism, Hitler, Mussolini and foundation writings of the NSDAP and explore social, historical and psychological factors contributing to the establishment of totalitarian regimes.
3. Identify key philosophical antecedents contributing to the rise of Nazism.
4. Recognize the breadth and diversity of human experiences during the Holocaust.
5. Articulate major conceptions of good and evil, including core issues of racism and genocide, and how they apply to the Holocaust.
6. Explore a variety of responses to the Holocaust in literature, visual, and performing arts and create a personal response.
7. Assess the Holocaust in light of other historical and modern events associated with the word genocide.
8. Describe the essence of the German historical debates (Historikerstreit) in the 1980's regarding the Holocaust.


Required Technology

More information on general computer and internet recommendations is available on the CCV IT Support page. https://support.ccv.edu/general/computer-recommendations/

Please see CCV's Digital Equity Statement (pg. 45) to learn more about CCV's commitment to supporting all students access the technology they need to successfully finish their courses.


Required Textbooks and Resources

This course uses one or more textbooks/books/simulations.

Fall 2024 textbook details will be available on 2024-05-20. On that date a link will be available below that will take you to eCampus, CCV's bookstore. The information provided there will be specific to this class. Please see this page for more information regarding the purchase of textbooks/books.

HUM-2040-VO01 Link to Textbooks for this course in eCampus.

The last day to use a Financial Aid Advance to purchase textbooks/books is the 3rd Tuesday of the semester. See your financial aid counselor at your academic center if you have any questions.


Evaluation Criteria

Your grade is based on the following:

Weekly work: 70%

Learning project: 30%.

Weekly work

Weekly points, which account for 70% of your grade, are tied to the number and timeliness and development of postings. weekly work.

Weekly work and deadlines:

Each week you will raise at least one discussion question on the week's topic. Your discussion questions for the week are due no later than Thursdays at 11:59 p.m.

You will respond each week to the discussion questions of two classmates. The first response is due no later Sunday at 11:59 p.m.

You will post a reading response each week. Reading responses are due by Fridays at 11:59 p.m.You'll respond to one classmate's reading response no later than Sundays at 11:59 p.m.

Most weeks we will have topic discussions (film discussions, video discussions, audio file discussions, and so on). Topic discussions are usually due no later than Saturdays at 11:59 p.m. Replies to classmates are due by Sundays at 11:59 pm.

Work posted on Mondays or later is not graded, nor do I respond to it. Mondays are your day off to prepare for the coming week, and my day to work on assessments and grading.

Development of weekly work:

Reading responses should be well developed essays that contain plentiful examples, cited where appropriate, that show clear comprehension of the text material.

Weekly discussion questions are your chance to learn about the week's focus, the texts, topics, or anything related to the topic. Please do not use discussion questions to "quiz" classmates; instead, use them to further your learning. Everyone should have regular questions about the Holocaust; it's a complex topic.

Your responses to classmates' discussion questions should be well developed and more than "I agree!" or "Great question!" The purpose of engaging with classmates is to explain why you agree or disagree, to help answer the classmate's questions, to offer some source possibilities, and so on.

Topic responses should contain specific examples that show understanding of the resource. Feel free to include questions in topic responses.

Citation: Please remember that, when using outside sources of any kind, the use of the source MUST be documented with BOTH in text citations and full end citations. Lack of adequate citation = plagiarism. Please be certain as well to cite specific quotes from the texts.

To earn full points, be active and prompt (meet deadlines). Develop your work, use examples, raise questions, reply to classmates, and do not plagiarize.

Learning project:

The learning project can earn 0 (not submitted;; plagiarized) to 30 (well developed) points. The learning project options are described in detail in our course site. Learning projects are expected to be thorough, focused on a main idea, supported by evidence from college-credible sources, structurally correct, correctly formatted in MLA format, and correctly cited in MLA format throughout with no plagiarism. Projects are graded on those criteria and on timeliness. To pass the course, you must earn at least 18 points on the project (a D-).


Grading Criteria

CCV Letter Grades as outlined in the Evaluation System Policy are assigned according to the following chart:

 HighLow
A+10098
A Less than 9893
A-Less than 9390
B+Less than 9088
B Less than 8883
B-Less than 8380
C+Less than 8078
C Less than 7873
C-Less than 7370
D+Less than 7068
D Less than 6863
D-Less than 6360
FLess than 60 
P10060
NPLess than 600


Weekly Schedule


Week/ModuleTopic  Readings  Assignments
 

1

Week 1

  

Read Chapter 1 in Dwork's bookHolocaust: A History.

See the videos in the Week 1 module.

This website is a useful resource:http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Holocaust/history.html

  

Participation

  1. Please post an introduction in the introductions thread by Thursday at 11:59 p.m.. As part of your introduction, please share what you hope to gain from the class. Also, as part of your intro, please tell us what preconceptions you have about the Holocaust. What do you think has helped to form those preconceptions?
  2. In the "Your discussion questions" thread, please raise a discussion question by Thursday at 11:59 p.m. Please reply to the discussion questions of at least two peers by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
  3. In the reading response thread, write a response to Ch 1 in Dwork by Friday at 11:59 p.m. As part of your response, comment on major historical developments detailed in the chapter that led to the rise of Hitler (meets EO 1). By Sunday at 11:59 p.m., have replied to the reading response of at least one classmate. Feel free to ask questions, to agree, to disagree, or to probe ideas in your reply to your classmate. Use paragraphs; use in text citations to cite quotes.

Responses should summarize the chapter, highlight any areas of confusion, raise questions, and even challenge ideas presented in the chapter.

 

2

Week 2

  

Read Chapter 2 in Dwork's bookHolocaust: A History.

View/read all resources in the Week 2 module.

  

Participation

  1. In the "Your discussion questions" thread, please raise a discussion question by Thursday at 11:59 p.m. Please reply to the discussion questions of at least two peers by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
  2. In the reading response thread, write a response to Ch 2 in Dwork by Friday at 11:59 p.m. As part of your response, comment on what you see as the most important developments detailed in the chapter that helped enable the Holocaust (meets EO 1). By Sunday at 11:59 p.m., have replied to the reading response of at least one classmate. Feel free to ask questions, to agree, to disagree, or to probe ideas in your reply to your classmate. Use paragraphs; use in text citations to cite quotes.
  3. Please read this article in theNew York Times:https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/13/opinion/nazis-holocaust-disabled.html?_r=0(Links to an external site.)(Links to an external site.) What are your reactions to it? Please post your reactions in the New York Times article reading responses thread by Saturday at 11:59 p.m. Have replied to a classmate’s post by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. (meets EOs 4 and 5)
 

3

Week 3

  

Read Chapters 3 and 4 in Dwork's bookHolocaust: A History.

View/read all resources in the Week 3 module.

  

articipation

  1. In the "Your discussion questions" thread, please raise a discussion question by Thursday at 11:59 p.m. Please reply to the discussion questions of at least two peers by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
  2. In the reading response thread, write a response to Ch 3 and 4 in Dwork by Friday at 11:59 p.m. As part of your response, articulate the key ideas of National Socialism, Mussolini and Fascism as explained in Dwork and philosophical ideas that you have seen this far that contribute to the rise of Nazism (meets EOs 2 and 3). By Sunday at 11:59 p.m., have replied to the reading response of at least one classmate. Feel free to ask questions, to agree, to disagree, or to probe ideas in your reply to your classmate. Use paragraphs; use in text citations to cite quotes.
  3. Visithttps://holocaustsurvivors.org/av-aids/photo-gallery/(Links to an external site.)Select at least four photos to view.
    In the photo discussion thread, Tell us about the photos. What do they have to offer us after all these years? Post your response by Saturday at 11:59 p.m. Have replied to one classmate’s posting by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. Meets EO 6.
 

4

Week 4

  

Read Chapter 5 in Dwork's bookHolocaust: A History.

SeeThe Pianist(on Netflix, or can be rented on Amazon Prime for $3.99:https://www.amazon.com/Pianist-Adrien-Brody/dp/B0026IQYEU(Links to an external site.))

View/read all resources in the Week 4 module.

  

Participation

  1. In the "Your discussion questions" thread, please raise a discussion question by Thursday at 11:59 p.m. Please reply to the discussion questions of at least two peers by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
  2. In the reading response thread, write a response to Ch 5 in Dwork by Friday at 11:59 p.m. Meets EOs 1 and 2. By Sunday at 11:59 p.m., have replied to the reading response of at least one classmate. Feel free to ask questions, to agree, to disagree, or to probe ideas in your reply to your classmate. Use paragraphs; use in text citations to cite quotes.
  3. See and be prepared to discuss The Pianist. In the film discussion thread, contribute a well developed assessment of what you think the film contributes to Holocaust studies and how it achieves its purposes. Please also discuss what you think, after seeing the film, was/were the most important factors in Szpilman's survival. Roughly 250 words. Meets EO 6 Post your response by Saturday at 11:59 p.m. Have replied to one classmate’s posting by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
 

5

Week 5

  

Read Chapter 6 in Dwork's bookHolocaust: A History.

View/read all resources in the Week 5 module.

  
  1. In the "Your discussion questions" thread, please raise a discussion question by Thursday at 11:59 p.m. Please reply to the discussion questions of at least two peers by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
  2. In the reading response thread, write a response to Ch 6 in Dwork by Friday at 11:59 p.m. Meets EO 4. By Sunday at 11:59 p.m., have replied to the reading response of at least one classmate. Feel free to ask questions, to agree, to disagree, or to probe ideas in your reply to your classmate. Use paragraphs; use in text citations to cite quotes.
  3. Research at least one other genocide since the Holocaust. Explain it briefly to us; in what ways is it similar to and different from the Holocaust? Cite at least two credible college-level sources (full MLA citations; a URL is not sufficient).Meets EO 7. Additionally, comment on the most important points you learned from the World Without Genocide site and the two videos. Post your work by Saturday at 11:59 p.m. Reply to at least one classmate by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
 

6

Week 6

  

If you haven’t started readingWhat We Knew,start now; we are discussing it in Week 8.

Read Chapter 7 in Dwork's bookHolocaust: A History.

SeeDefiance(On Netflix, or available from Amazon for $3.99:https://www.amazon.com/Defiance-Daniel-Craig/dp/B0095D3ZO6/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=defiance&qid=1629993647&s=instant-video&sr=1-2(Links to an external site.))

View/read all resources in the Week 6 module.

  
  1. In the "Your discussion questions" thread, please raise a discussion question by Thursday at 11:59 p.m. Please reply to the discussion questions of at least two peers by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
  2. In the reading response thread, write a response to Ch 7 in Dwork by Friday at 11:59 p.m. Meets EO 4. By Sunday at 11:59 p.m., have replied to the reading response of at least one classmate. Feel free to ask questions, to agree, to disagree, or to probe ideas in your reply to your classmate. Use paragraphs; use in text citations to cite quotes. Meets EO 4.
  3. See and be prepared to discussDefiance. In the film discussion thread, contribute a well developed assessment of what you think the film contributes to Holocaust studies and how it achieves its purposes. Also consider the following questions: Do you think the Bielskis were justified in how they treated collaborators? What do you think about the statement that the Bielskis were “sometimes as vicious as the Nazis”? In the context of the Holocaust, what ethical questions arise? Roughly 250 words. Meets EO 6. Post by Saturday at 11:59 p.m.; reply to a classmate by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
 

7

Week 7

  

Finish readingWhat WeKnew (we are discussing it next week).

Read Chapters 8 and 9 in Dwork's bookHolocaust: A History.

View/read all resources in the Week 7 module.

  

Participation

  1. In the "Your discussion questions" thread, please raise a discussion question by Thursday at 11:59 p.m. Please reply to the discussion questions of at least two peers by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
  2. In the reading response thread, write a response to Chs 8 and 9 in Dwork by Friday at 11:59 p.m. Meets EOs 4 and 5. By Sunday at 11:59 p.m., have replied to the reading response of at least one classmate. Feel free to ask questions, to agree, to disagree, or to probe ideas in your reply to your classmate. Use paragraphs; use in text citations to cite quotes.
  3. SeeDer Ewige JudeandTriumph of the Will(links in the module).Warning:Der Ewige Judeis a hatefilm.Startby reading the handout "Der Ewige Jude" (please read this BEFORE seeing the film).http://www.holocaustresearchproject.org/holoprelude/derewigejude.html
    (Links to an external site.)(Links to an external site.)

Also, please read this paper that focuses in particular on the psychological components, especially on two scenes that are disturbing: Jewish people equated to rats coming out of a sewer and the "kosher slaughter" scene:

http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/handle/2027.42/44639/10810_2004_Article_227864.pdf;jsessionid=C0CF78657221737FC1547368369F0FE9?sequence=1(Links to an external site.)(Links to an external site.)

Der Ewige Judeis an infamous Nazi propaganda film. Why was this film created; what was its purpose at the time? What does it tell us about the world view of its creators? Select one scene and explain how it is propaganda and how it is designed to foster hatred. Today it is considered a cult film amongst neo-Nazis. Explain why it is still dangerous as a tool of hatred. Additionally, share insights you gained about film as propaganda from watchingTriumph of the Will.Meets EOs 5 and 6.

Roughly 250 words. Post by Saturday at 11:59 p.m.; reply to a classmate by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.

 

8

Week 8

  

Have readWhat We Knew

View/read all resources in the Week 8 module.

  

BY NOW YOU SHOULD BE STARTING YOUR LEARNING PROJECT

Participation

  1. In the "Your discussion questions" thread, please raise a discussion question by Thursday at 11:59 p.m. Please reply to the discussion questions of at least two peers by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
  2. In the reading response thread, write a response toWhat We Knewby Friday at 11:59 p.m. Meets EOs 4 and 5. As part of your response, consider the following questions: What do we learn from the book about how people can be maneuvered into condoning and even collaborating with evil? If we perceive acts of evil and feign ignorance, are we collaborators? Do the perpetrators described seem like psychopaths, bureaucrats, or just "normal" people of their time? What understandings can we gain about the culture of Germany at the time and Nazi thinking from the book? By Sunday at 11:59 p.m., have replied to the reading response of at least one classmate. Feel free to ask questions, to agree, to disagree, or to probe ideas in your reply to your classmate. Use paragraphs; use in text citations to cite quotes.
  3. How can we connectOne Day in Auschwitzand the Franz Suchomel interview with the ideas inWhat We Knew?What do we learn about human experiences in the Holocaust from these two videos? Meets EO 6. Due Saturday by 11:59 pm; reply to at least one classmate’s post by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
 

9

Week 9

  

Read Chapter 10 in Dwork's bookHolocaust: A History.

View/read all resources in the Week 9 module.

  

Reading and viewing

Read Chapter 10 in Dwork's bookHolocaust: A History.

View/read all resources in the Week 9 module.

Participation

  1. In the "Your discussion questions" thread, please raise a discussion question by Thursday at 11:59 p.m. Please reply to the discussion questions of at least two peers by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
  2. In the reading response thread, write a response to Ch 10 in Dwork by Friday at 11:59 p.m. Meets EOs 4 and 5. By Sunday at 11:59 p.m., have replied to the reading response of at least one classmate. Feel free to ask questions, to agree, to disagree, or to probe ideas in your reply to your classmate. Use paragraphs; use in text citations to cite quotes.
  3. Visit one of the following audio galleries:

Fortunoff video testimonies, Yale:https://editions.fortunoff.library.yale.edu/(Links to an external site.)

British Library survivor testimonies:https://www.bl.uk/learning/histcitizen/voices/testimonies/survivors.html(Links to an external site.)

Voices of the Holocaust, Illinois Institute of technology:https://voices.library.iit.edu/solr-search/content?search_api_fulltext=(Links to an external site.)

Select at least four interviews (more are fine) and listen to them.

Discuss: what do you learn from these interviews (identify the ones you listened to) and the video of Alice Sommer, and how does listening to the survivor’s voices affect your understanding? Meets EOs 4, 5, and 6. Post your comments by Saturday at 11:59 p.m. Reply to at least one classmate’s comments by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.

 

10

Week 10

  

Read Chapter 11 in Dwork's bookHolocaust: A History.

View/read all resources in the Week 10 module.

  

Participation

  1. In the "Your discussion questions" thread, please raise a discussion question by Thursday at 11:59 p.m. Please reply to the discussion questions of at least two peers by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
  2. In the reading response thread, write a response to Ch 11 in Dwork by Friday at 11:59 p.m. As part of your response, take a position: were Nazi atrocities possible for the world to predict, or not? Support your position with facts/evidence from the book and other resources we have used. Meets EO 4 and 5. By Sunday at 11:59 p.m., have replied to the reading response of at least one classmate. Feel free to ask questions, to agree, to disagree, or to probe ideas in your reply to your classmate. Use paragraphs; use in text citations to cite quotes.
  3. Research discussion: Go to the Hartness Library online. Once there, go to the Academic Search Premier (EBSCO) database. Choose one of the following articles:
  • Monroe, Kristen Renwick. "Cracking The Code Of Genocide: The Moral Psychology Of Rescuers, Bystanders, And Nazis During The Holocaust."
  • Navarick, Douglas J. "Historical Psychology And The Milgram Paradigm: Tests Of An Experimentally Derived Model Of Defiance Using Accounts Of Massacres By Nazi Reserve Police Battalion 101."
  • Stargardt, Nicholas. "The Troubled Patriot: German Innerlichkeit In World War II

What do you learn from your article about social and psychological factors of Nazism? Explain. Connect any point from the video. Meets EO 2. Post your work by Saturday at 11:59 p.m. Reply to at least one classmate by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.

 

11

Week 11

  

Be readingMaus: It is coming up in week 13

As well, be well into your learning project; it is coming up in week 14.

Read Chapter 12 in Dwork's bookHolocaust: A History.

View/read all resources in the Week 11 module.

  

Participation

  1. In the "Your discussion questions" thread, please raise a discussion question by Thursday at 11:59 p.m. Please reply to the discussion questions of at least two peers by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
  2. In the reading response thread, write a response to Ch 12 in Dwork by Friday at 11:59 p.m. Meets EO 4. By Sunday at 11:59 p.m., have replied to the reading response of at least one classmate. Feel free to ask questions, to agree, to disagree, or to probe ideas in your reply to your classmate. Use paragraphs; use in text citations to cite quotes.
  3. Government discussion: Many citizens trust legislators (government officials). Many also believe laws are essential to follow. Think about the progression of laws and government statements and actions in Germany that led toward the Holocaust. What kinds of laws have been passed and what kinds of statements have been made by governmental officials here in the U.S. that did or could promote hatred and violence toward particular ethnic or religious groups? Given the evidence, do you think the US is immune from genocide? Why or why not? Resources in the module will help, but feel free to seek out additional college-credible resources. Support your ideas with evidence and of course cite your evidence. Post by Saturday at 11:59 p.m.; reply to a classmate’s post by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.

NEXT WEEK IS THANKSGIVING BREAK

 

12

Week 12

  

Thanksgiving week, no readings

  

Participation

  1. By the end of the week, contribute to the page set up in the module. Add your name and a description of the learning project you have chosen. What is your focus/topic? How far along are you?
 

13

Week 13

  

Finish Maus: It is coming up next week.

As well, be well into your learning project; it is coming up in week 15.

Read Chapter 13 in Dwork's book Holocaust: A History.

Rent and see the film Six Million and One, $3.99 on Amazon:https://jfi.org/watch-online/jfi-on-demand/six-million-and-one(Links to an external site.)

View/read all resources in the Week 12 module.

  

Participation

  1. In the "Your discussion questions" thread, please raise a discussion question by Thursday at 11:59 p.m. Please reply to the discussion questions of at least two peers by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
  2. In the reading response thread, write a response to Ch 13 in Dwork by Friday at 11:59 p.m. Meets EO 4. By Sunday at 11:59 p.m., have replied to the reading response of at least one classmate. Feel free to ask questions, to agree, to disagree, or to probe ideas in your reply to your classmate. Use paragraphs; use in text citations to cite quotes.
  3. Film discussion: What do we learn from Six Million and One and The Nazi Officer’s Wife about the effects of the Holocaust on descendants of the survivors as well as on survivors? Meets EOs 4 and 6. Support your ideas with evidence. Post by Saturday at 11:59 p.m.; reply to a classmate’s post by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
 

14

Week 14

  

Maus

View/read all resources in the Week 14 module.

As well, finish your learning project; it is due next week.

  
  1. In the "Your discussion questions" thread, please raise a discussion question by Thursday at 11:59 p.m. Please reply to the discussion questions of at least two peers by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
  2. In the reading response thread, write a response to Maus by Friday at 11:59 p.m. Meets EO 6. In your response, explain how the comic style helps to tell the story of the Holocaust. Does it trivialize the Holocaust? Why or why not? By Sunday at 11:59 p.m., have replied to the reading response of at least one classmate. Feel free to ask questions, to agree, to disagree, or to probe ideas in your reply to your classmate. Use paragraphs; use in text citations to cite quotes.
  3. Historikerstreit discussion: Read “Throwing Off Germany’s Imposed History” in the module. What do you think about Dr. Nolte’s views? Find, summarize (and cite) at least one other article on Historikerstreit and connect it to this one. Meets EO 8 . What might Nolte see as a U.S. historical "legend" given his views? Meets EO7. Due by Saturday at 11:59 p.m. Please respond to at least one classmate by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
 

15

Learning project and wrapping up

  

No New readings

  

Learning project dueTuesday, December 13at 11:59 p.m.. Please post it BOTH in the drop box (so I can grade it) and in the learning project discussion thread.

Participation

  1. In the "Your discussion questions" thread, please raise your last discussion question by Thursday at 11:59 p.m. Please reply to the discussion questions of at least two peers by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.
  2. In the learning project thread, please respond to two classmates’ projects. These should be detailed responses; “Great job!” is not an adequate response. Ask questions; point out strengths; suggest how the project might have been strengthened. Have completed your responses by Friday at 11:59 p.m.
  3. Final discussion: What have you gained from the course this semester? How do you plan to put into action what you have learned? Due by Saturday at 11:59 p.m. Replies to peers are welcome but not required.
 

Attendance Policy

Regular attendance and participation in classes are essential for success in and are completion requirements for courses at CCV. A student's failure to meet attendance requirements as specified in course descriptions will normally result in a non-satisfactory grade.

  • In general, missing more than 20% of a course due to absences, lateness or early departures may jeopardize a student's ability to earn a satisfactory final grade.
  • Attending an on-ground or synchronous course means a student appeared in the live classroom for at least a meaningful portion of a given class meeting. Attending an online course means a student posted a discussion forum response, completed a quiz or attempted some other academically required activity. Simply viewing a course item or module does not count as attendance.
  • Meeting the minimum attendance requirement for a course does not mean a student has satisfied the academic requirements for participation, which require students to go above and beyond simply attending a portion of the class. Faculty members will individually determine what constitutes participation in each course they teach and explain in their course descriptions how participation factors into a student's final grade.


Participation Expectations

You are expected to do several types of postings each week. One type is simply to raise a question for your classmates and me to consider. That can be as simple as a sentence.

Each week you will also be responding to readings, films, or both. I expected those responses to be very well developed; we use them as springboards to further discussion. Therefore, it's useful to know what "developed posting" means.

Think of your response as a mini-essay. I want to see specific details. If you refer to specific pages, I want to see those cited. I want to see analysis in addition to summary; most simply, I want to see that you have read or viewed the work, understand it thoroughly, and have your own thoughts about it.

This link will take you to an example of an article review:

http://www.wikihow.com/Sample/Research-Article-Review

The approach can be adapted for your reading and film responses.

Points

Discussion postings: 6 points total. Two points for a well-developed question posted on time. Two points each for well-developed responses to two classmates.

Reading responses: 7 points total. Up to five points for a well-developed response posted on time. Two points for a thoughtful reply to a classmate.

Film, audio, etc. discussions: 5 points total. Up to three points for a well developed response posted on time. Two points for a thoughtful reply to a classmate.

Topic discussion posts and film/audio discussion posts need to be supported by and include specific examples and evidence from the text or resources.

Deadlines

Each week our week begins on Tuesday and ends on Monday. To receive up to full points for weekly work, it must be submitted by the following deadlines:

  • by Thursday, 11:59 pm: At least one weekly discussion question must be posted.
  • by Friday, 11:59 pm: Your response to the weekly reading must be posted.
  • By Saturday at 11:59 p.m.: Your posting for any film, audio etc. discussions must be posted.
  • By Sunday at 11:59 pm: All graded work for the week must be complete (this means responding to other peers, raising additional questions, or posting other information that you want to contribute to the discussion to count toward your weekly grade).
  • Remember, you can always post before the deadlines. However, work posted after the deadlines is marked late. Please do not wait until the last possible moment to post.


Missing & Late Work Policy

Work posted on Mondays or later is not graded, nor do I respond to it. Mondays are your day off to prepare for the coming week, and my day to work on assessments and grading.

Late work loses one point per day. See the course schedule for deadlines for each assignment.

When a week's work is missed, it cannot be made up except in cases of a documented emergency (police report, hospital report, doctor's note, and so on). Any work posted after 11:59 pm on Sundays is not graded unless you notify me of an emergency. Having to work and so on is not an emergency.


Accessibility Services for Students with Disabilities:


CCV strives to mitigate barriers to course access for students with documented disabilities. To request accommodations, please
  1. Provide disability documentation to the Accessibility Coordinator at your academic center. https://ccv.edu/discover-resources/students-with-disabilities/
  2. Request an appointment to meet with accessibility coordinator to discuss your request and create an accommodation plan.
  3. Once created, students will share the accommodation plan with faculty. Please note, faculty cannot make disability accommodations outside of this process.


Academic Integrity


CCV has a commitment to honesty and excellence in academic work and expects the same from all students. Academic dishonesty, or cheating, can occur whenever you present -as your own work- something that you did not do. You can also be guilty of cheating if you help someone else cheat. Being unaware of what constitutes academic dishonesty (such as knowing what plagiarism is) does not absolve a student of the responsibility to be honest in his/her academic work. Academic dishonesty is taken very seriously and may lead to dismissal from the College.