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Web Schedule Summer 2020


Revision Date: 28-Apr-20

HUM-2010-VU02 - Seminar in Educational Inquiry


Online Class


Online courses take place 100% online via Canvas, without required in-person or Zoom meetings.


Synonym: 185007

Location: Winooski - Meets Online

Credits: 3 (45 hours)
Day/Times: Meets online
Semester Dates: 05-26-2020 to 08-17-2020
Last day to drop without a grade: 06-11-2020 - Refund Policy
Last day to withdraw (W grade): 07-14-2020 - Refund Policy
Faculty: Matthew Messier | View Faculty Credentials
Materials/Lab Fees: $75.00
This course has started, please contact the offering academic center about registration
This section meets the following General Education Requirement(s):
Seminar in Educational Inquiry
    Note
  1. Many degree programs have specific general education recommendations. In order to avoid taking unnecessary classes, please consult with additional resources like your program evaluation, your academic program page, and your academic advisor.
  2. Courses may only be used to meet one General Education Requirement.

Browse the Canvas Site for this class.

Course Description:

Inquiry is the foundation for this interdisciplinary capstone course. It provides a forum for critical thinking about substantive issues, problems, and themes that affect the world, our society, our communities, and our selves. Throughout the semester, students will be challenged to ask critical questions, evaluate evidence, create connections, and present ideas in discussions and writing. This process prepares students for developing and presenting a culminating portfolio through which they demonstrate proficiency in the graduation standards of writing and information literacy, as well as make connections to prior learning. Because the final portfolio is essential in demonstrating these proficiencies, students must complete the portfolio with a grade of C- or better in order to pass the course. This course is required for students planning to graduate and should be taken within the year prior to graduation once all competency area requirements have been satisfied. Prerequisite: English Composition and a Research & Writing Intensive course or equivalent skills.

Essential Objectives:

1. Explain how questions are framed and knowledge is gained in various disciplines, such as the sciences, humanities, and social sciences.
2. Investigate the philosophical and ethical questions arising from issues pertaining to identity, community, knowledge, truth, change and responsibility.
3. Demonstrate advanced skills of reading, writing and critical thinking in both group and individual work.
4. Locate, evaluate, and incorporate appropriate scholarly and professional sources, including primary and secondary evidence as needed, to address an academic research question.
5. Complete a culminating portfolio that includes:
a. A research paper with an arguable thesis that integrates five or more scholarly and professional sources to address an academic research question and demonstrates proficiency in the graduation standards of writing and information literacy according to the SEI research paper rubric.
b. A reflective essay that articulates how the student’s CCV experience has influenced their understanding of themselves and the world.
c. An oral presentation related to the content of the paper.

Textbooks:

Summer 2020 textbook data will be available on April 6. On that date a link will be available below that will take you to eCampus, CCV's bookstore. The information provided there will be for this course only. Please see this page for more information regarding the purchase of textbooks.

HUM-2010-VU02 Textbooks.

The last day to use a Financial Aid advance to purchase textbooks is the 3rd Tuesday of the semester. See your financial aid counselor at your academic center if you have any questions.

Contact Faculty:

Email: Matthew Messier
Hiring Coordinator for this course: Ashraf Alamatouri

Syllabus:

Syllabus

Seminar in Educational Inquiry

I. General Information

1. Location: Online

2. Dates: 26-May-20 to 17-August-20

3. Instructor: Matthew Messier

Email: mmessier238@gmail.com

Phone: 802 598-0052

II. Course Description:

Inquiry is the foundation for this interdisciplinary capstone course. It provides a forum for critical thinking about substantive issues, problems, and themes that affect the world, our society, our communities, and our selves. Throughout the semester, students will be challenged to ask critical questions, evaluate evidence, create connections, and present ideas in discussions and writing. This process prepares students for developing and presenting a culminating portfolio through which they demonstrate proficiency in the graduation standards of writing and information literacy, as well as make connections to prior learning. Because the final portfolio is essential in demonstrating these proficiencies, students must complete the portfolio with a grade of C- or better in order to pass the course. This course is required for students planning to graduate and should be taken within the year prior to graduation once all competency area requirements have been satisfied. Prerequisite: English Composition and a Research & Writing Intensive course or equivalent skills.

III. Essential Objectives:

The successful student will be able to:

1. Explain how questions are framed and knowledge is gained in various disciplines, such as the sciences, humanities, and social sciences.

2. Investigate the philosophical and ethical questions arising from issues pertaining to identity, community, knowledge, truth, change and responsibility.

3. Demonstrate advanced skills of reading, writing and critical thinking in both group and individual work.

4. Locate, evaluate, and incorporate appropriate scholarly and professional sources, including primary and secondary evidence as needed, to address an academic research question.

5. Complete a culminating portfolio that includes:

a. A research paper with an arguable thesis that integrates five or more scholarly and professional sources to address an academic research question and demonstrates proficiency in the graduation standards of writing and information literacy according to the SEI research paper rubric.

b. A reflective essay that articulates how the student’s CCV experience has influenced their understanding of themselves and the world.

c. A presentation related to the content of the paper.

IV: Readings:

You do not need a textbook for this course. Readings will be provided for you on Moodle. Readings are connected to SEI course themes, course description, and essential objectives.

V. Assessment

1. Portfolio (60% of course grade)

a. Divided into 3 Parts

1. Research paper (30% of course grade)

2. Reflective essay (15% of course grade)

3. Presentation (15% of course grade)

b. Part 1. Research Paper (30% of course grade) involves 6 stages that result in an 8 page paper

Stage 1: Research Topic (1% of course grade)

a. Find a topic that you can create a thesis from.

b. A thesis is a position statement about a “substantive issue that affects the world, our society, our communities, ourselves” (From SEI’s Course Description). A thesis must be brief (focused and clear), credible (backed by scholarly/authoritative sources), and arguable (opposed by scholarly/ authoritative sources)

c. Type your topic into the Turnitin assignment

Stage 2: Library Assignment (2% of course grade)

a. Go to “Class Librarian” found in the “Class Librarian and Library Resources” Section on our course page(Above Block 1). Hit “Reply” and ask your question about your topic.

b. Minimum Source Requirement: 5 sources (At least 3 scholarly sources and 2 “Presearch” sources - See “Finding Sources for your SEI Research Project” PowerPoint)

Stage 3: Thesis (3% of course grade)

a. A thesis is a position statement about a “substantive issue that affects the world, our society, our communities, ourselves” (From SEI’s Course Description).

b. A thesis must be:

1. Brief (focused and clear),

2. Credible (backed by scholarly/authoritative sources),

3. Arguable (opposed by scholarly/authoritative sources)

Stage 4: Outline (4% of course grade)

a. Brief and easy to follow

b. The main section headings are aligned with the reasons defending your thesis position

c. The subsection headings revolve around how or why reasons defending the main section they are related to.

d. This will help ensure that your draft reads as a persuasive essay rather than an informational one.

Stage 5: First Draft of your paper (8% of course grade)

a. Submit 4 parts in 1 word document:

1. Title page, Outline, 8 pages of text, and Works Cited page.

2. See “Sample Paper” for proper format

b. Important considerations include:

1. Following your outline with thesis driven information

2. Being clear up front what you are trying to say

3. Using good transitions

4. Avoiding repetition

5. Including plenty of scholarly citations for your points

6. Submit in .doc or .rtf format on “Turn it in”

c. Draft Assessment

1. Your raw score will be based on the SEI Rubric

2. This will give you an idea of how close your paper is to meeting the standards

3. Raw scores will be scaled 25%

Stage 6: Final Paper (12% of course grade)

a. Addresses all first draft feedback

c. Reflective essay (15% of course grade)

1. To what extent do you think that your major enhanced and/or influenced your understanding of the world and who you are as a person?

2. Three to four pages

d. Presentation (15% of course grade)

1. Present your research project

2. Discuss your thesis, reasons defending your thesis, sources used.

e. ePortfolio submission (Required for Course Completion)

1. See "How to submit your SEI Canvas ePortfolio" (Found in Block 6) for instructions on creating an ePortfolio

2. Include the 3 parts in your ePortfolio

1) Research Paper

2) Presentation

3) Reflection essay

3. Submit as a zip file

4. Extra 5 course points for submitting it on time

2. Online Discussions (40% of course grade)

a. Fifteen weekly Reading Discussions

1. Connecting the readings/videos to SEI themes, essential objectives and course description

2. Your initial post for the Weekly Reading Discussions is due by the end of the day on Friday. Late initial posts reduce your Weekly Reading Discussions grade by 50%.

3. For example, in Week 1’s Reading Discussion, any post received after May 29th would be considered late and reduced by 50%.

b. Six Research Project Discussions

1. Revolve around the 6 SEI research project stages

2. Discussions will begin at the start of each new block (blocks vary from 1-5 weeks) and finish at the end of the block when the SEI research project assignment is due so there will always be opportunity to discuss your SEI project with your fellow students and myself.

3. Use the discussions to address questions/concerns about your project or to help other students.

4. Your initial post due date for the six Research Project Discussions will be announced at the beginning of each Block. Late initial posts reduce the week’s Research Project Discussion grade by 50%.

c. The 21 discussions = 40% of your course grade.

d. Any post made after the discussion period is over will receive no credit. For example, in Week 1’s reading discussion, any post received after June 1st would receive no credit.

e. See the rubrics attached to the discussions for assessment details. (To view rubrics, click on the 3 vertical dots in the gray bar at the top of the discussion page)

3. Late assignments

a. Late assignments will receive no credit. The only exception is if there is an IT issue that is CCV’s fault. If this is the case, contact them and have them contact me. If they verify to me that it was their error, you will receive no deduction on a late assignment.

4. Participation (Between +5pts and -40 course points)

a. Based on attendance (No participation over a week = 1 absence)

b. If you have 100% attendance, your final course grade will be increased by 5 pts

c. After one absence, a student's final grade will be reduced.

1. Two absences reduce a student's final course grade by 5 course points

2. Three absences reduce a student's final course grade by 15 course points

3. Four absences result in course failure (-40 pts)

5. If you need extra help, use the extra CCV resources offered to you

a. “Get Help” at http://ccv.edu/discover-resources/

b. Help with the Research Paper at http://tutorials.libraries.vsc.edu/rbg/help

1. If you use your local Writing Center, bring this syllabus, the SEI paper rubric and your specific assignment’s feedback so they understand course expectations

a. Contact me if there are inconsistencies about expectations

c. The “Hartness Library Toolbox” in the “Course Introduction Block” can direct you to different resources the library has to offer

d. See PowerPoints/links for extra help with SEI research project stages

e. Call/email anytime with questions

VI: Additional Communication Options

a. Questions about our course

1. A place for you to ask general questions about the course or to talk about anything else that comes up.

2. Located in the Course Introduction Block

b. Recent Announcements (Top of the Course Website)

1. Course related announcements (When assignments have been graded, important changes to the course, etc.)

VII. Course Schedule: (SEI project assignments are in in red. Late assignments will receive no credit)

1. Block 1 (Starts Tuesday, May 26th - Ends Monday, June 1st)

Reading Discussion #1

Research Project Discussion #1: “Finding a Research Topic”

Research Project Assignment #1 “Research Topic” due June 1st

2. Block 2 (June 2nd - June 15th)

Reading Discussions 2 and 3

Research Project Discussion #2: “Finding Sources for your Paper”

Research Project Assignment #2 “Library Assignment” due June 15th

3. Block 3 (June 16th – 22nd)

Reading Discussion #4

Research Project Discussion #3 “Creating a Qualifying Thesis”

Research Project Assignment #3 “Thesis” due June 22nd

4. Block 4 (June 23rd – July 6th)

Reading Discussions 5, 6

Project Discussion #4 “Creating an Outline that follows your Thesis”

Research Project Assignment #4 “Outline” due July 6th

5. Block 5 (July 7th – July 27th)

Reading Discussions 7, 8, 9

Project Discussion #5 “First Draft”

Research Project Assignment #5 “1st Full Draft of your paper” due July 27th

6. Block 6 (July 28th – August 17th)

Reading Discussions 10, 11, 12

Project Discussion #6 “From First Draft to Final Draft”

Extra Discussion - "How's your ePortfolio going?" (This discussion is worth up to an extra 2 course pts)

Presentation - Due August 5th

Reflection essay on student's educational experience - Due August 12th

Research Project Assignment #6 “Final Paper” - Due August 17th

Please note: In order to receive accommodations for disabilities in this course, students must make an appointment to see the Americans with Disabilities Coordinator in their site and bring documentation with them.

Academic Honesty: CCV has a commitment to honesty and excellence in academic work and expects the same from all students. Academic dishonesty, or cheating, can occur whenever you present -as your own work- something that you did not do. You can also be guilty of cheating if you help someone else cheat. Being unaware of what constitutes academic dishonesty (such as knowing what plagiarism is) does not absolve a student of the responsibility to be honest in his/her academic work. Academic dishonesty is taken very seriously and may lead to dismissal from the College.

Course description details subject to change. Please refer to this document frequently.

VII. Appendix A

Research Paper Instructions

1. Design, compose and revise a 8 page final paper that includes an implied or explicit thesis statement, integrates relevant source material from five or more credible sources, and demonstrates proficiency in the graduation standards of writing and information literacy.

• A thesis is defined as a position statement or proposition advanced by the writer; a thesis is arguable (offering a debatable point or claim) and supportable (focused, credible, and clear).

Research Paper Evaluation Criteria and Rubric

Your final papers will be evaluated according to the following criteria or questions. The paper is worth 50 possible points. Use these questions and answers to evaluate your progress toward a finished draft of the paper.

Research Paper Rubric

5 points 4 points 3 points 2 points 1 points 0 points

Thesis • Detailed, focused.

• Specifically describes paper’s goals.

• Creatively & force-

fully articulated. • Clear & Argumentative.

• Engaging

• Appropriate

• Complete & descriptive. • Adequate.

• Present.

• Mechanical. • Missing details.

• Stated as informa- tional.

• Simplistic. • Not specifically related to topic.

• Seems to imply a point.

• Hard to point out. • No thesis.

Purpose • Clear goals for writing.

• Clear plan for writing.

• Maintains purpose throughout paper. • Uses language for goals that is occasionally clear.

• Purpose not fully maintained. • General description of purpose.

• Purpose implied inconsistently/

• Occasional shifts & detours in writing. • Purpose is inconsistent.

• Buried in wordy, meandering language.

• Not maintained. • Goals of writing is vague.

• Does not address thesis.

• Purpose abandoned or not maintained. • No clear purpose.

Critical & Creative • Effectively and skillfully integrates facts, examples, and others' ideas.

• Creatively reshapes ideas to serve thesis.

• Provides insightful context for ideas. • Appropriately integrates facts, examples, and others' ideas.

• Demonstrates some control of ideas w/in context of thesis.

• Shows context/analysis for ideas. • Shows occasional understanding of integrates facts, examples, and others' ideas.

• Ideas show only a general insight to topic/thesis.

• Inconsistent analysis. • Inconsistent understanding of integrates facts, examples, and others' ideas.

• Ideas & analysis are simplified. • Understanding of integrates facts, examples, and others' ideas was rudimentary.

• Contradictory/ unsupportable ideas & analysis. • No relevant development of ideas.

Examples, Support & Details • Fully supports ideas with documented sources.

• Complete, compelling & convincing analysis of source.

• Creatively and convincingly connects sources to thesis. • Appropriately connects sources to thesis.

• Competent & adequate analysis of sources.

• Consistently connects sources to thesis. • Adequately provides support for ideas.

• Lacks variety or persuasiveness.

• Loses connection to topic/thesis occasionally. • Ineffectively or inconsistently provides support for ideas.

• Missing or incorrect details.

• Source dropped in without analysis. • Support and details are random and unrelated to topic/thesis.

• Little to no development of source material. • No support or details.

Audience • Effective & insightful tone.

• Exceptional command & control of language.

• Excellent information integration. • Appropriate tone for academic writing.

• Clear & varied control of language.

• Clear information integration. • Adequate tone for academic writing.

• Basic control of language.

• Satisfactory information integration. • Language & tone are forced and/or clunky.

• Information integration is forced & uneven. • Writing is tone deaf.

• Random or unrelated integration of information.

• No audience awareness.

Organi-

zation &

Structure • Creative & insightful structure & organization of writing that deepens meaning of writing.

• Exceptional use of transitional language. • Appropriate, clear, logical organization that supports the thesis.

• Clear & varied use of transitional language. • Adequate & basic structure & organization.

• Generally supports thesis.

• Sufficient use of transitional language. • Random structure.

• Main points cobbled together.

• Ineffective or inconsistent use of connective & transitional language. • Unrelated or missing structural elements.

• Missing transitional language. • No coherent organization.

Fluency • Engaging prose with clear, rich writing.

• Masterful use of sentences to control pacing and persuasiveness of writing.

• Creative integration of source material to create new meaning. • Appropriately uses college-level vocabulary.

• Clear & solid control of sentences to build writing.

• Clear integration of source material into the writing. • Adequate use of vocabulary and basic sentence control.

• Satisfactory ability to integrate source material into the writing. • Ineffective use of vocabulary.

• Choppy, disjointed writing.

• Sources dropped in randomly as unrelated block quotes. • Sentences are random and ungrammatical, leading to confusion.

• Missing connections to source material. • Unreadable.

G.U.M. • No errors.

• Creatively deploys grammar to enhance meaning & understanding. • No noticeable errors.

• Very readable without distraction. • Readable despite distractions.

• Consistent errors in certain areas of grammar. • Errors interfere with understanding.

• Many sentences are incompressible. • Messy.

• Most sentences are incomprehensible. • Unreadable.

Info. Literacy • Creative & insightful reshaping of topic.

• Wide & surprising variety of peer-reviewed academic source materials.

• Sources are used to deepen the argument. • Appropriately reshapes topic during writing.

• Good & varied use of peer-reviewed sources.

• Sources are used accurately, relevantly, and properly. • Adequately presents topic consistently.

• Occasional use of peer-reviewed source materials.

• Sources are present and adequate. • Ineffectively controls topic throughout writing.

• Over-reliance on non-academic sources. • Randomly jumps from topic to other things during writing.

• Inappropriate sources. • No use of sources.

Citations • Citations are masterfully used to convince reader of the argument.

• Outstanding use of MLA or APA style that enhances the writing and reading experience. • Appropriate & clear citations.

• Correct use of MLA or APA style. • Adequate citations for subject.

• Some errors in MLA or APA style. • Significant errors in citation.

• Some citations don’t appear in Works Cited/Reference page.

• Some entries in Works Cited/References page don’t appear in text. • Random or non-standard approach to citations style.

• Abundant missing citations. • Plagiarized.

Accessibility Services for Students with Disabilities: CCV strives to mitigate barriers to course access for students with documented disabilities. To request accommodations, please

  1. Provide disability documentation to the Accessibility Coordinator at your academic center. https://ccv.edu/discover-resources/students-with-disabilities/
  2. Request an appointment to meet with accessibility coordinator to discuss your request and create an accommodation plan.
  3. Once created, students will share the accommodation plan with faculty. Please note, faculty cannot make disability accommodations outside of this process.

Academic Honesty: CCV has a commitment to honesty and excellence in academic work and expects the same from all students. Academic dishonesty, or cheating, can occur whenever you present -as your own work- something that you did not do. You can also be guilty of cheating if you help someone else cheat. Being unaware of what constitutes academic dishonesty (such as knowing what plagiarism is) does not absolve a student of the responsibility to be honest in his/her academic work. Academic dishonesty is taken very seriously and may lead to dismissal from the College.

Course description details subject to change. Please refer to this document frequently.

To check on space availability, choose Search for Classes.


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