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Essential Objectives

Course Syllabus


Revision Date: 02-Jul-24
 

Fall 2024 | ENG-1310-VO01 - Introduction to Literature


Online Class

Online courses take place 100% online via Canvas, without required in-person or Zoom meetings.

Location: Online
Credits: 3 (45 hours)
Day/Times: Meets online
Semester Dates: 09-03-2024 to 12-16-2024
Last day to drop without a grade: 09-16-2024 - Refund Policy
Last day to withdraw (W grade): 11-04-2024 - Refund Policy
Open Seats: 8 (as of 07-13-24 3:05 PM)
To check live space availability, Search for Courses.

Faculty

Nancy Thompson
View Faculty Credentials
View Faculty Statement
Hiring Coordinator for this course: Collin Lee

General Education Requirements


This section meets the following CCV General Education Requirement(s) for the current catalog year:
VSCS Arts & Aesthetics
CCV Writing and Research
    Note
  1. Many degree programs have specific general education recommendations. In order to avoid taking unnecessary classes, please consult with additional resources like your program evaluation, your academic program catalog year page, and your academic advisor.
  2. Courses may only be used to meet one General Education Requirement.

Course Description

In this course, students read a culturally diverse selection of fiction, poetry, and drama with an emphasis on how to study literature: understanding plot and character, identifying themes and the author's point of view, and analyzing techniques in prose and verse. This course fulfills the research and writing intensive requirement. Students must complete a final research paper with a grade of C- or better in order to pass this course. Prerequisite: English Composition.


Essential Objectives

1. Describe the formal elements of the novel, short fiction, poetry, non-fiction, and drama.
2. Define literary elements such as theme, character, plot, imagery, setting, point of view, and symbolism.
3. Analyze how writers use formal and literary elements to express ideas, emotions, and cultural values.
4. Identify figurative uses of language such as irony, metaphor, and personification from a wide range of literary works.
5. Describe the cultural and historical context of selected works of literature and explain the impact of global and/or cultural diversity on the development of these works.
6. Discuss the contributions of selected works of literature to social change, thought, and/or well-being on an individual or collective level.
7. Write short reaction papers and analyses of a wide range of selected literary works, critically editing drafts for precision and clarity as well as correct mechanics.
8. Demonstrate information literacy skills: distinguish between and utilize both primary and secondary sources; perform library and web-based literature searches; and evaluate data and resources for credibility, reliability, and validity.
9. Demonstrate the ability to apply APA citation style in academic writing by parenthetically citing sources in the text and correctly compiling them in the relevant end sources page.
10. Compose, revise, and edit a final paper that includes a thesis, integrates five or more scholarly and professional sources, including primary and secondary evidence as needed, to address an academic research question and demonstrate writing proficiency by achieving a grade of C- or better.


Required Technology

More information on general computer and internet recommendations is available on the CCV IT Support page. https://support.ccv.edu/general/computer-recommendations/

Please see CCV's Digital Equity Statement (pg. 45) to learn more about CCV's commitment to supporting all students access the technology they need to successfully finish their courses.


Required Textbooks and Resources

This course uses one or more textbooks/books/simulations.

Fall 2024 textbook details will be available on 2024-05-20. On that date a link will be available below that will take you to eCampus, CCV's bookstore. The information provided there will be specific to this class. Please see this page for more information regarding the purchase of textbooks/books.

ENG-1310-VO01 Link to Textbooks for this course in eCampus.

The last day to use a Financial Aid Advance to purchase textbooks/books is the 3rd Tuesday of the semester. See your financial aid counselor at your academic center if you have any questions.


Evaluation Criteria

Discussions and reading responses: 65%. Discussion and reading responses meet EOs 1-9.

One midterm quiz= 15%. The midterm essay meets EOs 1-3.

Final essay: 20%. The essay meets EOs 9 and 10.

Total: 100%

GRADING RUBRIC:

Grading Criteria:

Please note: If you copy and paste exercises, cheat, or commit other dishonesty, you will receive a zero for that week. The second time it happens, you will automatically fail the course regardless of your grade to that point.

Deadlines and criteria

In order to receive up to full discussion points each week you must
a) post a discussion question no later than Thursday at 11:59 p.m.
b) respond to the questions of at least 2 of your peers, concluding by Sunday night at 11:59 pm.

c) Post a response to the week's literature topic by Friday at 11:59 p.m. The response is a brief essay. See the information posted in Module 0 of the Canvas shell.

d) Reply to the brief essay of at least one student, pointing out strengths, areas for future work, and areas of agreement or disagreement, with specifics. Due by Sunday night at 11:59 p.m.
Minimum responses (exercises that are abbreviated or incorrect, one-line responses to peers, etc.) do not earn maximum points for the week.

In addition to meeting deadlines, all written work is scored holistically on the following six categories:
Content development and focus; Argumentation and logic; Clarity and strength of points; Organization ; Integration, ethical use and citation of acceptable resources ; Effective use of rhetorical patterns; Sentence structure, grammar and mechanics.


Work is also scored on meeting weekly deadlines. Again, those deadlines are
By Thursday at 11:59 p.m: the discussion question for the week is due.
By Friday at 11:59 p.m.: the brief essay is due.
By Sunday at 11:59 p.m.: all peer responses and work must be complete.

Please see the Canvas course site for weekly work rubrics.

Final essay rubric:
A (90-100 points) Outstanding work which complies with all requirements and demonstrates a thorough understanding of all course objectives. It will meet length requirements, have a clear central thesis, express and fully develop original ideas, be well supported with facts and academic sources, be carefully and correctly documented, be organized in a logical fashion that is linked with appropriate transitions, utilize an academic tone, and be free of grammatical and mechanical errors. It will accurately use the vocabulary and key concepts appropriate to the subject.

B (80-89 points)
Fine work which complies with all requirements and demonstrates a reasonable understanding of all course objectives. It will meet length requirements, have a clear central thesis, express and explore original ideas, be reasonably supported with facts and academic sources, be carefully and correctly documented, show an organizational strategy that usually includes appropriate transitions, utilize an academic tone, and have few grammatical and mechanical errors. It will accurately use the vocabulary and key concepts appropriate to the subject.

C (70-79 points)
Work of a satisfactory nature which complies with most requirements and demonstrates an understanding of a majority of the course objectives. It may not fully meet length requirements, may have significant organizational, factual or interpretive errors, may have a vague central focus, have few original ideas. The work is still reasonably supported with facts and academic sources, correctly documented (although there may be errors in documentation and/or integration of sources), have an inconsistent academic tone (too colloquial), and have significant grammatical and mechanical errors. It may show limited comprehension of the special vocabulary and key concepts appropriate to the subject.

D (60-69 points)
Weak work of an unsatisfactory nature which may not comply with requirements or demonstrate an understanding of some of the course objectives.
The work may indicate positions which demonstrate limited comprehension and use few relevant examples. The writing may contain significant organizational, factual or interpretive errors. It may not approach the length requirements, or may have significant documentation errors, including lack of appropriate documentation in a significant part of the body.

F (59 points or less)
Unacceptable work submitted with such significant deficiencies that no credit can be awarded. This includes work submitted without appropriate documentation, or any work found to violate academic honesty standards.


Grading Criteria

CCV Letter Grades as outlined in the Evaluation System Policy are assigned according to the following chart:

 HighLow
A+10098
A Less than 9893
A-Less than 9390
B+Less than 9088
B Less than 8883
B-Less than 8380
C+Less than 8078
C Less than 7873
C-Less than 7370
D+Less than 7068
D Less than 6863
D-Less than 6360
FLess than 60 
P10060
NPLess than 600


Weekly Schedule


Week/ModuleTopic  Readings  Assignments
 

1

Note: A full weekly assignment schedule is posted in Module 0 in our Canvas site. It shows all the reading response prompts and weekly deadlines for the whole term.

Modernism

  

"The Tattooer," Tanizaki Jun'ichiro. p. 78

"The Dead." James Joyce. p. 174.

Read all resources in the week 1 module.

  

Raise a discussion question and reply to the questions of two classmates by the weekly deadline. Post a reading response that addresses the prompt in the weekly assignment schedule (see our Canvas site).

 

2

Modernism

  

"The Metamorphosis," Frank Kafka, pg. 207.

"Diary of a Madman," Lu Xun, pg. 244.

  

Raise a discussion question and reply to the questions of two classmates by the weekly deadline. Post a reading response that addresses the prompt in the weekly assignment schedule (see our Canvas site). Reply to a classmate's essay; post the essay and reply by the weekly deadlines.

 

3

Modernism

  

"The Road to Salvation" Premchand, Pg. 311

"Barn Burning," William Faulkner, pg. 375.

"An Old and Established Name," Lao She, pg. 409

"The Garden of Forking Paths," Jorge Luis Borges, p. 487

  

Raise a discussion question and reply to the questions of two classmates by the weekly deadline. Post a reading response that addresses the prompt in the weekly assignment schedule (see our Canvas site). Reply to the essay of a classmate; post your essay and your response by the weekly deadline.

 

4

Modernism -- Poetry

  

"Ithaka," Constantine Cavafy (514); "Easter 1916," William Butler Yeats (522); "Archaic T0rso of Apollo," Rainer Maria Rilke (535); "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," T.S. Eliot (541); "I'm Explaining a Few Things," Pablo Neruda (588); "I Speak of the City," Octavio Paz (634).

  

Read the mid term essay directions carefully.

Raise a discussion question and reply to the questions of two classmates by the weekly deadline. Post a reading response that addresses the prompt in the weekly assignment schedule (see our Canvas site). Reply to the essay of a classmate; post your essay and your response by the weekly deadline.

 

5

Modernism - Manifestos

  

Read all the manifestos, pp 641-671

  

Raise a discussion question and reply to the questions of two classmates by the weekly deadline. Post a reading response that addresses the prompt in the weekly assignment schedule (see our Canvas site). Reply to the essay of a classmate; post your essay and your response by the weekly deadline.

 

6

Postwar and Postcolonial Literature

  

"House Taken Over," Julio Cortazar, p. 689

"This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen," Tadeusz Borowski, pg. 695

  

Raise a discussion question and reply to the questions of two classmates by the weekly deadline. Post a reading response that addresses the prompt in the weekly assignment schedule (see our Canvas site). Reply to the essay of a classmate; post your essay and your response by the weekly deadline.

 

7

Postwar and Postcolonial Literature

  

"The Old Chief Mshlanga," Doris Lessing, p. 718

"Toba Tek Singh," Saadat Hasan Manto, p. 729

"Notes of a Native Son," James Baldwin, p. 736

  

Mid term quiz due by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. See Module 0 for an overview and Week 7 module for specific directions.

Raise a discussion question and reply to the questions of two classmates by the weekly deadline. Post a reading response that addresses the prompt in the weekly assignment schedule (see our Canvas site). Reply to the essay of a classmate; post your essay and your response by the weekly deadline.

 

8

Postwar and Postcolonial Literature

  

"The Guest," Albert Camus, p. 751

"The Vane Sisters," Vladimir Nabokov, p. 798

  

Raise a discussion question and reply to the questions of two classmates by the weekly deadline. Post a reading response that addresses the prompt in the weekly assignment schedule (see our Canvas site). Reply to the essay of a classmate; post your essay and your response by the weekly deadline.

 

9

Postwar and Postcolonial Literature

  

"Chike's School Days," Chinua Achebe, p. 827

"Aura," Carlos Fuentes, p. 832

"Walker Brothers Cowboy," Alice Munro, p. 913

  

Raise a discussion question and reply to the questions of two classmates by the weekly deadline. Post a reading response that addresses the prompt in the weekly assignment schedule (see our Canvas site). Reply to the essay of a classmate; post your essay and your response by the weekly deadline.

Start readingDeath and the King's Horseman(p. 1051) for your final essay. Instructions for the final essay are in week 11. The play is about 50 pages long, and you will have an interim assignment due on it in week 12; start reading now.

 

10

Postwar and Postcolonial Poetry

  

Poems of Leopold Sedar Senghor, pp. 676-687

"Identity Card," Mahmoud Darwish, p. 893

  

Raise a discussion question and reply to the questions of two classmates by the weekly deadline. Post a reading response that addresses the prompt in the weekly assignment schedule (see our Canvas site). Reply to the essay of a classmate; post your essay and your response by the weekly deadline.

 

11

Contemporary Literature - Poetry

  

"Sleep in Jerusalem" (936) and "Tourists" (937, Yehuda Amichai

"Elegy" (950), "The Sea is History" (951), and "North and South" (954, Derek Walcott

"Digging" (979) and "The Tollund Man" (981), Seamus Heaney

  

Raise a discussion question and reply to the questions of two classmates by the weekly deadline. Post a reading response that addresses the prompt in the weekly assignment schedule (see our Canvas site). Reply to the essay of a classmate; post your essay and your response by the weekly deadline.

Review the directions in this module for the final essay. Develop for yourself a trailhead question (a question with which to start your research, a focusing question) and use it to start to find sources for your final essay. You will need to find two credible online sources and three sources from the library databases (five total). You will be posting your working thesis and an alphabetized list of citations for your sources next week before Thanksgiving. The Citations page in Module 0 will take you to the Purdue OWL for help with forming citations.

 

12

Begin the final essay

  

No readings are due this week

  

Post the week 12 assignment (working thesis for the final essay, a list of sources for the essay) and any questions you have by Wednesday at 11:59 p.m.

 

13

Contemporary World Literature

  

"Death Constant Beyond Love" Gabriel Garcia Marquez, p. 986

"One Out of Many," V.S. Naipaul, p. 1004

  

Raise a discussion question and reply to the questions of two classmates by the weekly deadline. Post a reading response that addresses the prompt in the weekly assignment schedule (see our Canvas site). Reply to the essay of a classmate; post your essay and your response by the weekly deadline.

Create and post a full sentence outline of your final essay by Saturday at 11:59 p.m. Use the outline to begin your draft; you will need to send your working draft to Tutor.com next week.

 

14

Contemporary World Literature

  

"The Old Gun," Mo Yan, p. 1189; "And of Clay We Are Created," Isabel Allende, p 1223; "Drown," Junot Diaz, p. 1240.

  

Raise a discussion question and reply to the questions of two classmates by the weekly deadline. Post a reading response that addresses the prompt in the weekly assignment schedule (see our Canvas site). Reply to the essay of a classmate; post your essay and your response by the weekly deadline.

Send your essay to Tutor.com. Post either the tutor comments or your summary of the tutor comments in the assignment drop box by Sunday at 11:59 p.m.

 

15

Contemporary World Literature and wrapping up

  

You have no readings this week aside from the resources in the week 15 module.

  

The final paper is due Friday, December 13, at 11:59 p.m. Before submitting it to the drop box, edit it carefully using the GMU editing checklist located in the module.

2. By Saturday at 11:59 p.m., post to the Week 15 discussion. Reflect on all three of the following:

a) What was most challenging to you in this class? How did you meet those challenges, and what did you learn from meeting those challenges?

b) Before this class, what were your thoughts about literature? What did you think it was; how important did you think it was? What are your thoughts about it now; how has your thinking about literature changed during the class?

c) In what ways did your prior learning connect to what you learned here? How can you connect your learning in this class to future classes or your life or work in general?

You do not need to reply to a classmate's post, although you should feel free to reply if you'd like.

 

Attendance Policy

Regular attendance and participation in classes are essential for success in and are completion requirements for courses at CCV. A student's failure to meet attendance requirements as specified in course descriptions will normally result in a non-satisfactory grade.

  • In general, missing more than 20% of a course due to absences, lateness or early departures may jeopardize a student's ability to earn a satisfactory final grade.
  • Attending an on-ground or synchronous course means a student appeared in the live classroom for at least a meaningful portion of a given class meeting. Attending an online course means a student posted a discussion forum response, completed a quiz or attempted some other academically required activity. Simply viewing a course item or module does not count as attendance.
  • Meeting the minimum attendance requirement for a course does not mean a student has satisfied the academic requirements for participation, which require students to go above and beyond simply attending a portion of the class. Faculty members will individually determine what constitutes participation in each course they teach and explain in their course descriptions how participation factors into a student's final grade.


Participation Expectations

You are expected to do several types of postings each week. One type is simply to raise a question for your classmates and me to consider. That can be as simple as a sentence.

Each week you will also be responding to readings. I expect those responses to be very well developed; we use them as springboards to further discussion. Please see the resources in our Canvas section; in Module 0 look for "Expectations for Postings" and "Citation."

Points

Discussion postings: 6 points total. Two points for a well-developed question posted on time. Two points each for well-developed responses to two classmates.

Reading responses: 13 points total. Up to ten points for a well-developed response posted on time. Up to three points for a well-developed reply to a classmate.

Deadlines

Each week our week begins on Tuesday and ends on Monday. To receive up to full points for weekly work, it must be submitted by the following deadlines:

  • by Thursday, 11:59 pm: At least one weekly discussion question must be posted.
  • by Friday, 11:59 pm: Your response to the weekly reading must be posted.
  • By Sunday at 11:59 pm: All graded work for the week must be complete (this means responding to other peers, raising additional questions, or posting other information that you want to contribute to the discussion to count toward your weekly grade).
  • Remember, you can always post before the deadlines. However, work posted after the deadlines is marked late and loses points. Please do not wait until the last possible moment to post.


Missing & Late Work Policy

Work posted on Mondays or later is not graded, nor do I respond to it. Mondays are your day off to prepare for the coming week, and my day to work on assessments and grading.

Late work loses one point per day. See the course schedule for deadlines for each assignment.

When a week's work is missed, it cannot be made up except in cases of a documented emergency (police report, hospital report, doctor's note, and so on). Any work posted after 11:59 pm on Sundays is not graded unless you notify me of an emergency. Having to work and so on is not an emergency.


Accessibility Services for Students with Disabilities:


CCV strives to mitigate barriers to course access for students with documented disabilities. To request accommodations, please
  1. Provide disability documentation to the Accessibility Coordinator at your academic center. https://ccv.edu/discover-resources/students-with-disabilities/
  2. Request an appointment to meet with accessibility coordinator to discuss your request and create an accommodation plan.
  3. Once created, students will share the accommodation plan with faculty. Please note, faculty cannot make disability accommodations outside of this process.


Academic Integrity


CCV has a commitment to honesty and excellence in academic work and expects the same from all students. Academic dishonesty, or cheating, can occur whenever you present -as your own work- something that you did not do. You can also be guilty of cheating if you help someone else cheat. Being unaware of what constitutes academic dishonesty (such as knowing what plagiarism is) does not absolve a student of the responsibility to be honest in his/her academic work. Academic dishonesty is taken very seriously and may lead to dismissal from the College.