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Essential Objectives

Web Schedule Fall 2019


Revision Date: 07-Oct-19

COM-2360-VA01X - Conflict Resolution


Synonym: 187371
Location: St. Albans
Credits: 3 (45 hours)
Accelerated Section: This course has special meeting dates and times. See comments below or consult VSC Web Services - Search for Sections in the VSC portal for specific dates and times. If you have any questions call the site office offering the course.
Day/Times: Friday, 05:00P - 09:00P & Saturday & Sunday, 08:30A - 05:30P
Semester Dates: 10-25-2019 to 11-24-2019
Last day to drop without a grade: 10-31-2019 - Refund Policy
Last day to withdraw (W grade): 11-12-2019 - Refund Policy
Faculty: Jeanne Kaczka-Valliere | View Faculty Credentials
This course has started, please contact the offering academic center about registration
This section meets the following General Education Requirement(s):
Communication
    Note
  1. Many degree programs have specific general education recommendations. In order to avoid taking unnecessary classes, please consult with additional resources like your program evaluation, your academic program page, and your academic advisor.
  2. Courses may only be used to meet one General Education Requirement.

Course Description:

Students will explore the scope and nature of, and become acquainted with, methods of conflict resolution and nonviolent change at various levels. Focuses on active listening and oral communication skills, principled negotiation, mediation, arbitration, and nonviolent direct action. Students also examine their own personal communication styles with regard to conflict.

Essential Objectives:

1. Explore the nature of conflict and conflict management.
2. Describe different conflict management processes and their characteristics, including conflict resolution, negotiation, mediation, and nonviolent change.
3. Discuss the connections between conflict, violence, and human nature.
4. Examine the role of ethics in managing conflicts.
5. Interpret and understand personal conflict styles in order to identify roadblocks to communication.
6. Develop strategies for active listening, assertiveness, and cooperation in order to strengthen his/her skills in managing everyday conflict in the workplace and at home.
7. Demonstrate proficiency in speaking through participation in mock conflicts, role playing, presentations, and discussion.
8. Prepare a formal presentation that demonstrates proficiency using the CCV Oral Communication Rubric.

Additional Instructor Pre-Assignments/Notes/Comments:

You will start receiving emails with a google survey and pre-assignment notes a few weeks before we first meet. Check your CCV emails regularly.

Methods:

WELCOME TO CONFLICT RESOLUTION!

Conflict resolution – understanding conflict, conflict-awareness and having skills to resolve conflict(s) – are foundational tenants to life. This class explores the nature of conflict in our personal and professional lives. Educational modalities include short-lectures, meaningful discussions and skill-building practices. You will be expected to actively participate by attending class, being on time and positively engage in discussions and in partner/group work. Communication is key to this course. This includes respectful dialogue and coming to class with an open mind.

As an accelerated course (2 jam-packed weekends!), it is essential that the course be structured to include plenty of time to move around and to have downtime. Come prepared to interact with classmates through role-playing, skill-building exercises and fun activities. In order to actively engage in learning, our brains need breaks. There will be personal thinking and reflection time. I will also build in time for snack and “teatime” breaks. Please bring snacks and lunch. Breaks will be 15 minutes and lunch will be 45 minutes.

This class meets the Communication requirement for most CCV degrees and the Vermont State Colleges graduation standard in Oral Communication.

Teaching Methods

Learning should be interactive, hands-on and fun! Learning environments are essential to the way we acquire knowledge and retain information. The first step is to create a positive, respectful space for learning and growth. Establishing a community norms are one of the initial activities we will do as a class. Come prepared and explore how you learn and what you need to actively engage with this course.

Experiential learning – learning by doing – is a keystone to the structure and approach of this course. As such, this class in heavily reliant on communication, dialogue and participation. A variety of formats will be used including Individual work and dyad/triad classroom activities and discussions. Students are graded on attendance and meaningful participation.

Evaluation Criteria:

Discussion/Participation The course heavily relies on class discussions and participation. Your grade in this area will be dependent on your attendance as well as active and meaningful participation in class discussions. 15
In-class Partner/group work, Exercises & Role-Play Cooperation and working together are essential components to communication and tenants of this course. You will often be asked to work with partners or in groups. These activities are meant to further your understanding of the course concepts and to practice the skills needed to communicate effectively and compassionately with others. Your grade in this are will be based on your ability to work cooperatively with your classmate(s), to convey an understanding of class concepts and actively engaging with the material. 25
Assignments/Quizzes Assignments and quizzes will be periodically given to demonstrate that you are reading course material and understanding course concepts. The assignments in this category will be collected and graded. 15
Final Presentation The final presentation will demonstrate effective conflict resolution assessment and skills. You will work in a group to create a mock conflict resolution scenario. The mock conflict resolution should have a developed scenario, characters, dialogue, a conflict map, conflict assessment tools 25
Final Paper You will write a 5-6-page paper analyzing a conflict and its resolution utilizing core class concepts, readings and skill-building exercises discussed in class. 20
Total 100

Grading Criteria:

A+ through A-: For any work to receive an "A," it must clearly be exceptional or outstanding work. It must demonstrate keen insight and original thinking. It must not only demonstrate full understanding of the topic or issues addressed, but it must also provide a critical analysis of these. In addition, an "A" grade reflects a student's ability to clearly and thoughtfully articulate his or her learning.

B+ through B-: For any work to receive a "B," it must be good to excellent work. It must demonstrate strong originality, comprehension, critical thinking, and attention to detail. In addition, a "B" grade reflects a student's ability to clearly articulate his or her learning.

C+ through C-: For any work to receive a "C," it must meet the expectations of the assignment. It must demonstrate solid comprehension, critical thinking, and attention to detail. In addition, a "C" grade reflects a student's ability to adequately articulate his or her learning.

D+ through D-: For any work to receive a "D," it must marginally meet the expectations of the assignment. It demonstrates minimal comprehension, critical thinking, and attention to detail. In addition, a "D" grade may reflect a student's difficulty in articulating his or her learning.

F: Work that receives an "F" grade does not meet the expectations or objectives of the assignment. It demonstrates consistent problems with comprehension, organization, critical thinking, and supporting details. In addition, an "F" grade reflects a student's inability to articulate his or her learning. Students are strongly urged to discuss this grade with their instructor and advisor.

P: Equivalent to D (+/-) or better and therefore course will not count as credit for specific program requirements or competence area requirements.

NP: indicates failure to meet course objectives and/or failure to meet grading criteria for successful completion as described in the instructor's course description.

Textbooks:

Fall 2019 textbook data will be available on May 13. On that date a link will be available below that will take you to eCampus, CCV's bookstore. The information provided there will be for this course only. Please see this page for more information regarding the purchase of textbooks.

The last day to use a Financial Aid advance to purchase textbooks is the 3rd Tuesday of the semester. See your financial aid counselor at your academic center if you have any questions.

Contact Faculty:

Email: Jeanne Kaczka-Valliere
Hiring Coordinator for this course: Dana Lee

Attendance Policy:

Regular attendance is essential for academic success in this course. Students who do not attend class and/or participate in class discussions will lose points for the participation portion of your overall grade. I will note absences and tardiness. Students can miss up to two classes (excused or unexcused) without penalty; a third absence classes (excused or unexcused) will result in a full letter grade deduction from the student’s final grade in the course; a fourth absence (excused or unexcused) will result in an automatic failure in this course. When absences/non-participation occurs, it is the student’s responsibility to obtain the information missed by communicating with the instructor at jmk12201@ccv.vsc.edu.

Policy on late/incomplete work

If a student is unable to complete activities and assignments for any reason, it is at the discretion of the instructor to approve/provide extensions or any modified work for any missed work. Students should communicate with me through email at jmk12201@ccv.vsc.edu.

Syllabus:

Course Structure

Class 1 -- Friday, October 25th, 5-9pm

Objectives: Setting clear expectation and getting to know each other. Explore the connections between conflict, violence, and human nature.

• Introductions & Icebreakers

• Course Overview

• Establish Community Norms

• What is Conflict Resolution? Why study Conflict Resolution?

• Exploring the nature of conflict: What is conflict? What are the levels of conflict? What are the causes of conflict? What escalates conflict?

• Wrap-up: next day review, assignments & lingering questions

Class 2 -- Saturday, October 25th, 8:30-5:30 pm

Objective: Explore conflict theories and conflict management. Interpret and understand personal conflict styles in order to identify roadblocks to communication.

• Introduction/Agenda/Quiz

• What are different Conflict Theories?

• What are (personal) conflict styles & reactions?

• What are roadblocks to communication?

• What are stages of conflict?

• Wrap-up: next day review, assignments & lingering questions

Class 3 -- Sunday, October 27th, 8:30-5:30pm

Objectives: Examine approaches to managing and analyzing conflict. Describe different conflict management processes and their characteristics, including conflict resolution, negotiation, mediation, and nonviolent change.

• Introduction/Agenda/Quiz

• Introduction to terms. What are approaches to managing conflict?

• Analyzing conflict -- What is conflict analysis? What are ways of analyzing conflict?

• Independent work/check-in and question time

• Wrap-up: next day review & lingering question

Conflict Analysis & Mapping assignment due November 15, 2019

Class 4 -- Friday, November 25th, 5-9pm

Objectives: Gain understanding of different issues pertaining to conflict (identity/emotions/etc.). Examine the role of ethics and emotions in managing conflicts.

• Introduction/Agenda

• Conflict Mapping Presentations start (1/3 class)

• Explore ethics and issues pertaining to conflict

• Wrap-up: next day review & lingering questions

Class 5 -- Saturday, November 22nd, 8:30-5:30pm

Objectives: Learn different ways to managing conflict and explore various conflict resolution strategies & skills. Develop strategies for active listening, assertiveness, and cooperation in order to strengthen his/her skills in managing everyday conflict in the workplace and at home.

• Introduction/Agenda

• Conflict Mapping Presentation (remaining class)

• Lecture & skill-building: conflict assessment tools?

• Group work time

• Wrap-up: next day review & lingering questions

Class 6 -- Sunday, November 23rd, 8:30-5:30pm

Objective: Discuss role of non-violent change and peace education. Students do their presentations. Wrap-up class.

• Introduction/Agenda

• Group work time

• Lecture: Non-violent change and peace education

• Final Exam – Mock conflict resolution group presentations

• In-class wrap-up!

Final Paper Due December 6th, 2019

Please note: In order to receive accommodations for disabilities in this course, students must make an appointment to see the Americans with Disabilities Coordinator in their site and bring documentation with them.

Academic Honesty: CCV has a commitment to honesty and excellence in academic work and expects the same from all students. Academic dishonesty, or cheating, can occur whenever you present -as your own work- something that you did not do. You can also be guilty of cheating if you help someone else cheat. Being unaware of what constitutes academic dishonesty (such as knowing what plagiarism is) does not absolve a student of the responsibility to be honest in his/her academic work. Academic dishonesty is taken very seriously and may lead to dismissal from the College.

*The instructor reserves the right to change this schedule as necessary to meet instructional needs. Course description details subject to change. Please refer to this document frequently.

Please note: In order to receive accommodations for disabilities in this course, students must make an appointment to see the Americans with Disabilities Coordinator in their site and bring documentation with them.

Academic Honesty: CCV has a commitment to honesty and excellence in academic work and expects the same from all students. Academic dishonesty, or cheating, can occur whenever you present -as your own work- something that you did not do. You can also be guilty of cheating if you help someone else cheat. Being unaware of what constitutes academic dishonesty (such as knowing what plagiarism is) does not absolve a student of the responsibility to be honest in his/her academic work. Academic dishonesty is taken very seriously and may lead to dismissal from the College.

Course description details subject to change. Please refer to this document frequently.

To check on space availability, choose Search for Classes.


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