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2015-16

Web Schedule Summer 2015


Revision Date: 08-Apr-15

HIS-1111-VO01 - World History I


Synonym: 131624
Location: Online
Credits: 3 (45 hours)
Day/Times: Meets online
Semester Dates: 05-26-2015 to 08-17-2015
Faculty: Mary Dreher | View Faculty Credentials

Materials/Lab Fees: $0
Open Seats/Section Limit: -2/16 (as of 05-22-15 10:12 PM)

Course Description:

This survey course explores the economic, political, cultural, and social developments in world history from the rise of civilization to 1500 CE in Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas. The course highlights geography, cultural and political movements, and human interactions that influenced the historical evolution of various world societies and their interrelationships within a global context.

Essential Objectives:

1. Discuss characteristics of various human societies from foraging to complex societies.
2. Analyze political and social structures found in ancient world societies and their impact on the modern world.
3. Investigate the diverse ideologies and religions found in ancient world societies including Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Confucianism, Rational Thought, and Christianity.
4. Assess significant characteristics of social identity found in ancient world societies, and discuss resulting social and gender hierarchies.
5. Identify the new ideas and worldviews that characterized the Renaissance and evaluate their effect on European hegemony and its consequences.
6. Assess the impact of economics and trade on world cultural interactions.
7. Explore the relationship between the geographical landscape and the development of ancient world societies and cultures.
8. Engage in and evaluate historical research employing information literacy skills.
9. Analyze the theses, context, values, perspectives, and facts in historical primary and secondary texts.

Additional Instructor Pre-Assignments/Notes/Comments:

A little about myself…..

I completed my undergraduate work at the University of Vermont, and hold a Masters of Arts in Liberal Studies (MALS) degree from Skidmore College.  In graduate school I concentrated my study in the disciplines of History and Anthropology, with a focus on global demographic trends; my thesis work examined modern day micro credit projects in the United States and sub-Saharan Africa.  Most of my fieldwork was done in East Africa where I taught in a rural secondary school and did logistics work at a large refugee camp on the borders of Somalia, Kenya and Ethiopia with the International Rescue Committee (IRC).

I have been back in my home state of Vermont for over ten years, raising my children, and teaching History and Anthropology at CCV, Johnson State College and Vermont Technical College.  More recently I began working full time for the Community College of Vermont as a Coordinator of Academic Services at the Montpelier Academic Center. 

I have a true passion for Global History , and enjoy sharing lived experiences with students in the classroom.  I am looking forward to ‘meeting’ all of you in this History course!  Please feel free to contact me with questions or concerns that you might have throughout the semester. 

 

Methods:

No Text Required

 

  • Students are required to contribute to our ongoing discussion throughout the week, and are encouraged to address multiple questions posed by both the instructor and fellow students.  Frequent and relevant contributions to class discussions will contribute to a rich classroom environment and contribute to student participation percentage of the grade (60 % of final grade).
  • Each week students are required to read supplementary material posted in the external links tab on the course site (see the course syllabus for list of readings). Students will be asked to go over the material carefully, post questions and thoughts about the reading on the discussion board, and then write responses and reactions to each in a journal entry.  Students are encouraged to write two or three paragraphs each week on the readings and websites, connecting the material to the topics for the week. Creative thought is encouraged in the journals, with relevant entries that reflect a thoughtful and critical analysis. The journal should be kept as a computer file, so it can be handed in at the end of the semester for grading.  I reserve the right to collect the journal two times during the semester to check progress, but will not assign a grade until the end of the semester.

  • Students are required to complete a midterm and final exam, both in the form of a critical essay.  Exams questions to be posted by the instructor two weeks prior to due date.  See weekly syllabus for exam dates.

 

Evaluation Criteria:

Participation in Discussion Forum:  60% of grade

A small lecture will be posted each week by Tuesday at 12:00 noon on the course discussion board by the instructor, accompanied by five questions about the material for the week.

Students are required to respond to at least one of the instructor’s questions and post a relevant question of their own by 12:00 noon Thursday.

Students are required to respond to at least two questions posed by fellow students by 12:00 noon on Friday.

Note:  I have posted the minimum requirements for class attendance here. If a student fails to meet these requirements in compliance with posted deadlines, an absence for the week will result.  Three absences result in automatic failure of the course

Students will earn up to five points per week for a total of 60 possible points for discussion board contributions.

Students will earn up to five points (A work) when participation is substantive, and illustrates that the student has a thorough understanding of the subject matter as evidenced through appropriate use of subject specific vocabulary and key concepts.

Questions posed by the student should clearly relate to the material from course reading and discussion, and arguments, theories and conclusions should be well developed and show evidence of critical thinking and reflection. 

Responses and questions are submitted ahead of schedule, in an effort to promote rich and thoughtful discussions amongst class members.

Students will earn up to four points (B work) when responses and questions illustrate the student understands the subject matter as evidenced through appropriate use of subject specific vocabulary and key concepts.

      Questions posed by the students peripherally relate to the material from the course reading and, with arguments theories and conclusions are adequately developed.

      Responses and questions are submitted on time, according to deadlines outlined in the syllabus/assignments listing.

Students will earn up to three points (C work) when responses and questions illustrate basic understanding of subject matter, and discussion board posts may be limited in nature and may not relate directly to the specific ideas and questions posed.

      Questions posed do not always relate to the ideas being discussed and researched.

      Responses and questions are not submitted on time, according to deadlines outlined in the syllabus/assignments listing.

Students will earn up to two points (D work) when responses and questions illustrate limited understanding of subject matter.

Responses to other student ideas and questions are not included or questions to others students are not posed.

      Responses and questions are not submitted on time, according to deadlines outlined in the syllabus/assignments listing.

Students will earn below one point (F work) when student response does not illustrate an understanding of the subject matter, and students do not respond to the components of the discussion assignment.

      Responses to other student ideas and questions are not included and questions to others students are not posed.

 Weekly Journal Entry: 15% of grade

In addition to the chapter readings, students are required to take notes on weekly supplementary/applied readings and then write reactions to each in a journal for a total of twelve journal entries.  I will ask students to send the journal via the digital drop box three times during the semester for a look over. The complete journal will be submitted at the end of the semester for grading, and will consist of 15% of the final grade.  Specifics for these assignments are posted on the course syllabus. 

 

Mid-Term Exam:  10% of grade

Final Exam: 15% of grade

Students have the opportunity to choose one out of three essays for the midterm and final exams.  Exam guidelines are posted on the course syllabus.

 

 

Grading Criteria:

 

A through A+/90-100 points:

 

For work to receive an "A," it must be exceptional.  The work must demonstrate keen insight and creative, original thinking. It must demonstrate a full understanding of the topics, concepts and issues addressed both in class and in the readings, as well as demonstrate critical analysis of the course material.  An "A" grade reflects a student's ability to clearly and thoughtfully articulate his or her learning in class projects and participation, with timely completion of all class projects and exams.  Minimum of 90% of total points obtained.

 

B through B+/80-89 points:

 

For work to receive a "B," it must be good to excellent work. The work must demonstrate strong originality, comprehension, critical thinking, and attention to detail. In addition, a "B" grade reflects a student's ability to clearly articulate his or her learning in class projects and participation, with timely completion of all class projects and exams.  Minimum of 80% of total points obtained.

 

C through C+/70-79 points:

 

For work to receive a "C," it must meet the expectations of the assignment. It must demonstrate solid comprehension, critical thinking, and attention to detail. In addition, a "C" grade reflects a student's ability to adequately articulate his or her learning, with timely completion of all class projects and exams.  Minimum of 70% of total points obtained.

 

D through D+/60-69 points :

For  work to receive a "D," it must marginally meet the expectations of the assignment. It demonstrates minimal comprehension, critical thinking, and attention to detail. In addition, a "D" grade may reflect a student's difficulty in articulating his or her learning, with completion of class projects and exams.  Minimum of 60% of total points obtained.

F:

Work that receives an "F" grade does not meet the expectations or objectives of the course requirements assignment. It demonstrates consistent problems with comprehension, organization, critical thinking, and supporting details. In addition, an "F" grade reflects a student's inability to articulate his or her learning. Students are strongly urged to discuss this grade with their instructor and advisor.

P: indicates satisfactory completion of course objectives (C- or better).

NP: indicates failure to meet course objectives and/or failure to meet grading criteria for successful completion as described in the instructor's course description.

 

 

 

 

Textbooks:

Summer 2015 textbook data will be uploaded on May 2. We strongly suggest that you verify the information below with our online bookseller EdMap before purchasing textbooks from another vendor. If your course is at the Winooski center, check the UVM Bookstore for textbook and pricing information.

No Text Required, ISBN: NTR, ED MAP   $0.00

Attendance Policy:

Attendance Policy:  

Attendance for World History II includes consistent participation in the discussion board and completion of required assignments each week.

Students are required to post the following in the discussion board on a weekly basis:

-Respond to a minimum of one question posted by the instructor

-Post at least one question for student/instructor response

-Respond to a minimum of two of your classmate’s questions

Failure to post the minimum requirements on a weekly basis will be recorded as an absence.  Three absences from class result in failure of the course.

 

 

Faculty Contact Information:

Email Address: Mary.Dreher@ccv.edu
Hiring Coordinator for this course: John Christensen - jdc03020@ccv.vsc.edu

Please note: In order to receive accommodations for disabilities in this course, students must make an appointment to see the Americans with Disabilities Coordinator in their site and bring documentation with them.

Academic Honesty: CCV has a commitment to honesty and excellence in academic work and expects the same from all students. Academic dishonesty, or cheating, can occur whenever you present -as your own work- something that you did not do. You can also be guilty of cheating if you help someone else cheat. Being unaware of what constitutes academic dishonesty (such as knowing what plagiarism is) does not absolve a student of the responsibility to be honest in his/her academic work. Academic dishonesty is taken very seriously and may lead to dismissal from the College.

Course description details subject to change. Please refer to this document frequently.

To check on space availability, choose Search for Classes.


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