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Revision Date: 08-Jun-16

ENG-1061-VO03 - English Composition


Synonym: 153032
Location: Online
Credits: 3 (45 hours)
Day/Times: Meets online
Semester Dates: 09-06-2016 to 12-19-2016
Last day to drop without a grade: 09-26-2016
Last day to withdraw (W grade): 11-07-2016
Faculty: Janice Mitchell-Love | View Faculty Credentials

Open Seats/Section Limit: 0/16 (as of 08-29-16 2:10 PM)

Course Description:

In this course, students develop effective composition skills and research techniques. Students learn strategies for organizing, evaluating, and revising their work through extensive reading of a variety of essay styles and literary texts; apply writing and research techniques to their papers; and demonstrate proficiency in first-year college-level writing and information literacy.

Essential Objectives:

1. Consistently apply an appropriate writing process that includes planning, drafting, revising and editing.
2. Demonstrate in written work an awareness of the relationship among writer, subject, audience, and purpose.
3. Demonstrate writing proficiency with a range of rhetorical approaches to include narration, exposition, argument, and critical analysis and recognize the stylistic and structural strategies in the writing of others.
4. Focus written work around an explicit central thesis, a position statement or proposition advanced by the writer that is arguable and supportable and develop the thesis systematically, using specific details and supporting evidence.
5. Compose written work that demonstrates effective use of sentence structure, paragraphing, grammar, syntax, punctuation, and spelling.
6. Collect, organize, and use a variety of traditional and electronic resources, critically evaluating information.
7. Demonstrate proficiency in research writing skills by completing one or more papers that:
a) Develop and support an arguable thesis in written work;
b) Collect, organize, evaluate and use a variety of traditional and electronic resources;
c) Incorporate relevant information and sources into written work; and
d) Appropriately acknowledge and document sources, using standard MLA or APA styles.

Additional Instructor Pre-Assignments/Notes/Comments:

Here are the textbooks for the course:

 

Alberico, Jennifer, et al.  The English Composition Reader. 2nd ed. Acton, MA: 
     XanEdu, 2014. ISBN: 9781583901465
Hacker, Diana and Nancy Sommers. A Pocket Style Manual. 7th ed. with 2016
     MLA Update.  Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2016.  ISBN 9781319083526

Methods:

The methods and materials for English Composition will include weekly writing and reading assignments. Writing will be in a variety of forms such as but not limited to journals/reading logs, formal essays, research assignments, and a mini research project.  Students will read essays and other writings in order to explore writing possibilities, study different writing styles, and develop/hone critical analysis skills.  There will be active participation in the discussion forum, submission of essay drafts to the discussion board for peer review, constructive feedback to peers, submissions of journals, and participation in small group collaborative activities. Students will review grammar/punctuation conventions weekly and study related topics in-depth as needed. Finally, there will be work on vocabulary development in the area of commonly confused words/homonyms.  

Overview:

Your work this semester is to improve your writing through close reading, drafts of your own writing, revisions of your own writing, and critiques and discussions of your own and classmates' writings.  I will give you detailed comments on your work.  Your classmates will also comment on your work through peer review.  Both of these types of comments will help you to improve as a writer.  However, the major driver of your success will be you; online courses are much more self-directed than if you were in the traditional classroom.  That's a good thing in that the online format  gives you significant freedom to choose when and where to do your week's work, but do make sure you keep up with the schedule of assignments and feel free to ask me any questions that you might have.  I'm always, always here for you.

It is critical for your success in English Composition I to complete the reading assignment before starting the essay assignment.  The reading will inform your work with both information and examples. 

Each week you might have the following kinds of assignments:  reading about the type of writing we are discussing that week in instructor handouts and in The English Composition Reader and reading several essays that illustrate that kind of writing in The English Composition Reader; either a practice writing, a short essay, or a rough draft of a longer essay; a journal that is either a reading log on essays you've read or an examination of your own writing strategies; grammar exercises; and a few commonly confused words or homonyms to make your own.  Later on in the semester when work begins on the final essay, which is a short researched argument, you will also have weekly homework assignments involving preparation tasks for that essay.

Course Structure:

For purposes of this course, the week begins on Tuesday morning, when the Discussion Board for the week opens.  Generally the due dates for homework tasks are as follows:  Sunday nights at 11:59 p.m. (grammar homework and an occasional journal, writing, or discussion forum task) and Monday nights at 11:59 p.m. (most journals, writing, and discussion forum tasks). Occasionally, drafts of writing exercises whether they are practice writings, drafts of short essays, or rough drafts of longer essays will be due earlier in the week to allow time for peer review comments before the week's end.  As a general rule, please remember the following:  the later you post your work and responses, the less time people have to respond to your work and to engage in any meaningful dialogue.  Occasionally, this could affect your grade.  Each week ends at 11:59 p.m. on Monday nights.

Note:  I attempt to establish generous due dates for posting to the forum and for final drafts of your writing assignments, knowing that many of you are taking this class online because of complex professional and familial commitments.  I may have to change this if students post too late in the week for fruitful conversations.   

Late Work:

Unless you have an emergency situation, have talked to me before the assignment is due, and have gotten permission from me to be late, no late assignments are accepted.  Note:  simply notifying me does not give you permission to be late; I have to answer you and give you that permission. 

Absences

 

Please note:  attendance is taken from Discussion Board participation.  If you contribute at all during the week, you will get credit for attendance.  Attendance and the discussion board grade are two different entities:  the grade for Discussion Board  is dependent on the quality of your participation.

Evaluation Criteria:

Your grade will be derived from the following:  participation in discussion forums (which requires complete homework preparation); formal essays, one of which is a mini research project; informal essays that are homework practices for the graded writing assignments; journals/reading logs on some of the readings; grammar exercises (homework); and vocabulary development (homonyms and commonly confused words).

The final grade will be derived using the following weighting of components:

25%          Participation in discussion forums 

60%          Seven formal essays:  four @ 5% each (description, definition, cause/effect, and process analysis), two @ 10% each (personal narrative and comparison/contrast), and a mini research essay @ 20%

  5%          Journal/reading logs and examinations of writing strategies (10)

  5%          Homework assignments -- 10 tasks having to do with mini research essay                                

  5%          Grammar and Vocabulary (Commonly Confused Words) Exercises (9)

Evaluation of Essays:

Grading details and/or rubrics will accompany essay assignments.

Evaluation of Discussion Forums:

See the Course Description.

Explanation of Grading in the Course.

See the Course Description.

 

Grading Criteria:

A+ through A-: For any work to receive an "A," it must clearly be exceptional or outstanding work. It must demonstrate keen insight and original thinking. It must not only demonstrate full understanding of the topic or issues addressed, but it must also provide a critical analysis of these. In addition, an "A" grade reflects a student's ability to clearly and thoughtfully articulate his or her learning.

B+ through B-: For any work to receive a "B," it must be good to excellent work. It must demonstrate strong originality, comprehension, critical thinking, and attention to detail. In addition, a "B" grade reflects a student's ability to clearly articulate his or her learning.

C+ through C-: For any work to receive a "C," it must meet the expectations of the assignment. It must demonstrate solid comprehension, critical thinking, and attention to detail. In addition, a "C" grade reflects a student's ability to adequately articulate his or her learning.

D+ through D-: For any work to receive a "D," it must marginally meet the expectations of the assignment. It demonstrates minimal comprehension, critical thinking, and attention to detail. In addition, a "D" grade may reflect a student's difficulty in articulating his or her learning.

F: Work that receives an "F" grade does not meet the expectations or objectives of the assignment. It demonstrates consistent problems with comprehension, organization, critical thinking, and supporting details. In addition, an "F" grade reflects a student's inability to articulate his or her learning. Students are strongly urged to discuss this grade with their instructor and advisor.

0:  Work that receives a zero was not submitted at all or was intentionally plagiarized.  Students are strongly urged to discuss this grade with their instructor and advisor.

Grading for Discussion Board 

A = Outstanding Quality:  Postings demonstrate a solid understanding of the concepts, topics and ideas as evidenced by thoughtful responses and questions that show a clear connection with and/or are integrated with the course material at hand.  Postings show depth and include many supporting details.  A posting of outstanding quality might demonstrate, for example, a critical analysis of an existing posted idea or introduce a different interpretation to an existing concept or idea.  When discussing literature, quotes from the reading, when appropriate, are included.   Outstanding postings demonstrate the following characteristics:  they are thoroughly developed; they are completely free of major grammatical or mechanical errors; they demonstrate a reasonable attempt to be free of minor grammatical or mechanical errors; they are well argued with many supportive examples and illustrations from readings and discussion; and they show strong evidence of original thinking.  In outstanding postings, the tone is clear and respectful  Postings are submitted on-time and are distributed throughout the week.  All directions, such as required number of sentences per post, are followed.  (Note:  underlining is simply to emphasize points often overlooked by past students.)

 

B = Good quality:  Postings demonstrate an adequate understanding of the concepts, topics, and ideas as evidenced by posting more general statements in the forum.  A good quality posting might, for example, indicate agreement or disagreement with an existing discussion including a limited explanation or justification but would not offer depth of critical analysis or a different interpretation to an existing concept or idea as an outstanding post might.  When discussing literature, quotes from the reading, when appropriate, are included.  Postings are thoroughly developed, largely free of major and minor grammatical or mechanical errors, are reasonably argued with some supportive example and illustrations from readings and discussions, and show evidence of original thinking.  In good postings, the tone is clear and respectful.  Postings are submitted on-time and are distributed throughout the week.  Directions, such as required number of sentences per post, are generally followed.  (Note: underlining is simply to emphasize points often overlooked by past students.)

 

C = Fair quality:  Postings demonstrate a restricted understanding of the concepts, topics, and ideas as evidenced by posting information that could be derived from prior posts and/or including highly general comments.  When discussing literature, quotes from the reading, when appropriate, are not included.  Postings show average development, contain consistent major and minor grammatical or mechanical errors, incorporate few supportive examples and illustrations from readings and discussion, and/or show marginal evidence of original thinking.  In fair postings, the tone is clear and respectful.  Postings are submitted on-time but are not distributed throughout the week.  Directions, such as required number of sentences per post, are not followed.  (Note: underlining is simply to emphasize points often overlooked by past students.)

 

D = Poor quality:  Postings do not contribute materially to discussion.  There is insignificant interaction with peers and little development of thought or technique. Demonstration of acceptable grammar and mechanics usage is poor.  In poor postings, the tone is respectful.  Postings may not be submitted on-time and may not be distributed throughout the week. 

 

F = Unsatisfactory quality:   Postings are not submitted on-time or postings are not submitted at all.  Student work could be plagiarized.  Student work is so insubstantial that credit cannot be awarded.  Posting could be so unintelligible that a determination of tone cannot be rendered. 

 

0 = Zero:  no postings submitted for the week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Textbooks:

Fall 2016 textbook data will be uploaded on August 4. We strongly suggest that you verify the information below with our online bookseller EdMap before purchasing textbooks from another vendor. If your course is at the Winooski center, check the UVM Bookstore for textbook and pricing information.

A Pocket Style Manual, ISBN: 9781319083526, Bedford/St. Martin's   $36.46

Additional Options: Rental |

English Composition ReaderCCV Custom Text, ISBN: 9781583901465, Copley Custom Textbooks   $53.66

Attendance Policy:

Regular attendance and participation in classes are essential components of a student's success in this class. Please be aware that missing more than three (3) classes may result in a non-satisfactory grade.  Students on financial aid (grants and/or loans) should be aware that they could lose their financial aid by missing multiple classes.


Contact Faculty:

Email: Janice Mitchell-Love
Hiring Coordinator for this course: Jennifer Alberico

Syllabus:

'ENG 1061: Section VO03: English Composition I Fall Semester, 2016: September 6th, 2016 through December 16th, 2016 Syllabus Overview '

 

ENG 1061: Section VO03: English Composition I
Fall Semester, 2016: September 6th, 2016 through December 16th, 2016
Syllabus Overview
Note #1: assignment details will be posted weekly on Moodle
    Note #2: subject to adjustment for class needs
Note #3: all Hacker (A Pocket Style Manual) page assignments are for the older 7th edition – not the one coming out this summer. I’ll correct those page numbers as soon as I have the correct edition which is 7e with 2016 MLA updates.
 
Instructor:      Jan Mitchell-Love                                          
E-mail:            Janice.Mitchell-Love@ccv.edu or JLMLove@aol.com
 
WEEK 1: Tuesday, September 6th through September 12th:    
      Getting Started
Reading:
In The English Composition Reader:
 “Writing at CCV” (1-9)
“General Writing Process (10-17)
“A Dream Deferred” (95)
In A Pocket Style Manual:
No reading
Instructor Handout: ‘Who Am I?’
 
Week 1 Assignments:
To be submitted on Moodle:
1. ‘Who Am I?’ (see Week 1Moodle for assignment)
2. Discussion Board
 
Not to be submitted:
1. Commonly Confused Words are in A Pocket Style Manual (called CCW after this): a, an (260); accept, except (260); adverse, averse (260).
Directions for CCW: – no weekly written work – review and make these words your own – graded check-ups on Weeks 4, 7, 10, and 13 to make sure you are becoming comfortable with these words.
 
WEEK 2: Tuesday, September 13th through Monday, September 19th:
                  Essay Organization and Description, begin
Reading:         
In The English Composition Reader:
“How to Write a Complete Sentence” (32)
“Four Types of Sentences” (33)
 Rhetorical Mode: Description (139-141)
“The Feed Lot” (142-157), “Shooting Dad” (158-164), and “The Santa Ana” (172-174)
In A Pocket Style Manual:
No reading
Instructor Handout: “The Sweat Bath Ritual” by Mary Brave Bird
Instructor Handout: Review of Essay Organization
Instructor Handout: Parts of Speech and Functions
 
Week 2 Assignments:
To be submitted on Moodle:   
1. Practice essay on paragraph development (see Week 2 Moodle block for assignment details)
2. Journal #1: reading log on description essay selections (see Week 2 Moodle block for assignment details)
3. Graded Homework Check-up #1: Subjects and Verbs (see Week 2 Moodle block for assignment details)
4. Discussion Board
 
Not to be submitted:   
1. Grammar Topic of the Week: in A Pocket Style Manual (called APSM after this): Repair sentence fragments (40-42): complete practices 14-1 to 14-4 as needed
2. CCW: affect, effect (260); all together, altogether (260); allusion, illusion (261)
 
WEEK 3: Tuesday, September 20th through Monday, September 26th:
                  Description, continued
Reading:        
In The English Composition Reader:  
Rhetorical Mode: Description, continued
“The Serpents of Paradise” (185-191), “Am I Blue?” (192-196), and “The Hearts and Minds Guys” (197-203)
In A Pocket Style Manual:
No reading
Instructor Handout: Similes and Metaphors
Instructor Handout: Prepositions and Indefinite Pronouns
 
Week 3 Assignments:
To be submitted on Moodle:
1. Major Paper #1: Descriptive Essay (5 %): see Week 3 Moodle block for assignment details
2. Discussion Board
 
Not to be submitted:
1. Grammar Topic of the Week: in APSM: Section 15: Revise run-on sentences (42-45): complete practices 15-1 to 15-4 as needed.
2. CCW:  among, between (261); amoral, immoral (261); amount, number (261)
 
WEEK 4: Tuesday, September 27th through Monday, October 3rd:  
                  Narration, begin
Reading:        
In The English Composition Reader:           
Rhetorical Mode: Narration (92-94)
“No Name Woman” (113-123), “Thirty-Eight Who Saw Murder Didn’t Call the Police” (124-127), “The Back of the Bus” (128-134), and “The Fourth of July” (135-138)
In A Pocket Style Manual:
No reading
Instructor handout: Peer Review Process: The Personal Narrative     
Instructor Handout: Transitions
Instructor handout:   “Truck-Stop Girls” by M Catherine Maternowska
 
Week 4 Assignments:
To be submitted on Moodle:
1. Major Paper #2: 
Rough draft of personal narrative (10 %): see Week 2 Moodle block for assignment details
2. Journal #2: reading log on narrative selections (see Week 4 Moodle block for assignment details)
3. Journal #3A: writing strategies: the rough draft (see Week 4 Moodle block for assignment details)
4. Graded Homework Check-up #2: Fragments and Run-ons (see Week 4 Moodle block for assignment details)
5. Graded Homework Check-up #3: CCW: Weeks 1 through 3 (see Week 4 Moodle block for assignment details)
6. Discussion Board (note: there will be peer review of rough draft of Major Paper #2)
 
Not to be submitted:
1. Grammar Topic of the Week: in APSM: Section 10: Make subjects and verbs agree (20-24) and Section 16: Review grammar concerns for multilingual writers (45-53): complete practices 10-1 to 10-3 and 16-1 to 16-9 as needed
2. CCW: bad, badly (261); can, may (262); capital, capitol (262)
 
WEEK 5: Tuesday, October 4th through Monday, October 10th:       
                  Narration (continued) and Illustration/Exemplification
Reading:         
In The English Composition Reader:        
Rhetorical Mode: Narration, continued
“Million-Dollar Murray” (99-112)
Rhetorical Mode: Example (205-208)
“Simplicity” (209-211), “Clutter” (212-215), “Just Walk on By: Black Men and Public Space” (216-219), “The Catbird Seat” (220-222), and “Homeless” (233-235)
In A Pocket Style Manual:
No reading
Instructor Handout: “Salvation” by Langston Hughes (narration)
Instructor Handout: “Why Looks Are the Last Bastion of Discrimination” by Deborah L. Rhode (exemplification)
 
To be submitted on Moodle:
1. Major Paper #2: final draft of personal narrative (10%):  see Week 4 Moodle block for assignment details
2. Journal #3B: writing strategies: the final draft (see Week 5 Moodle block for assignment details)
3. Journal #4: reading log on illustration/exemplification selections (see Week 5 Moodle block for assignment details)
4. Discussion Board
 
Not to be submitted:
1. Grammar Topic of the Week: in APSM: Section 11: Be alert to other problems with verbs (24-30) and Section 23: Abbreviations, numbers, and italics (78-82): complete practices 11-1 to 11-6 and 23-1 to 23-3 as needed.
2. CCW: cite, site (262); complement, compliment (262-263); elicit, illicit (264)
 
WEEK 6: Tuesday, October 11th through Monday, October 17th:
                  Definition, Begin Argumentation and Begin Research Process
Reading:         
In The English Composition Reader:          
“The Research Process” (18-27)
Rhetorical Mode: Definition (236-238)
“The World of Doublespeak” (239-245), “Meanings of a Word” (248-250), “What Is Poverty?” (251-255), and “I Want a Wife” (256-258)         
In A Pocket Style Manual:        
Read pages 88-89: “Posing a research question.” (Section 25).  
 
Instructor Handout: “I Am a Cripple” by Nancy Mairs
Instructor Handout: Comparison and Contrast
 
To be submitted on Moodle:  
1. Journal #5: reading log on definition selections (see Week 6 Moodle block for assignment details)           
2. Discussion Board
 
Not to be submitted:
1. Grammar Topic of the Week: in APSM: Section 6: Prefer Active Verbs (3-5) and Section 17: The comma (55-61): complete practices 2-1 to 2-4 and 17-1 to 17-5 as needed.
2. CCW: emigrate from, immigrate to (264); farther, further (264); fewer, less (264)
3. Mini research project (Paper #7): about project and topic selection (see Week 6 Moodle block for this information)
 
WEEK 7: Tuesday, October 18th through Monday, October 24th:
                  Comparison/Contrast; Argumentation, continued; Research  Process, continued
Reading:        
In The English Composition Reader
On comma usage (28-first eight lines of 30)
Rhetorical Mode: Comparison & Contrast (310-313)
“Neat People vs. Sloppy People” (322-324), “Batting Clean Up & Striking Out” (325-326),
“Talk in the Intimate Relationship: His and Hers” (327-337), and “Beauty and the Beast” (338-340)
Rhetorical Mode: Argumentation (361-364)
“Letter from a Birmingham Jail” (365-380)
In A Pocket Style Manual        :        
Begin reading pages 89-99 (Section 26: “Finding appropriate sources” and Section 27: “Evaluating sources.” Also review pages 130-154 (Section 33b, “MLA list of works cited”). 
Instructor Handout: Comma Usage
 
To be submitted on Moodle:
1. Major Paper #3: final draft of definition (5%): see Week 7 Moodle block for assignment details
2. Journal #6: reading log on selections from comparison/contrast (see Week 6 Moodle block for assignment details)
3. Graded Homework Check-up #4: CCW: Weeks 4 through 6 (see Week 7 Moodle block for assignment details)
4. Homework Task #1 (for mini research essay): topic proposal for Major Paper #7 (see Week 7 Moodle block for assignment details)
5. Discussion Board
 
Not to be submitted:
1. Grammar Topic of the Week: in APSM: Section 12: Use pronouns with care (30-37) and Section 24: Spelling and the hyphen (82-86): complete practices 12-1 to 12-11 and 24-1 as needed.
2. CCW: imply, infer (265); its, it’s (266); lie, lay (25)
           
WEEK 8: Tuesday, October 25th through Monday, October 31st:  
                  Comparison/Contrast, continued; Argumentation, continued; Research
                  Process, continued
Reading:         
In The English Composition Reader:       
On apostrophe usage (30-top half of 31)
Rhetorical Mode: Argumentation, continued   
“No Time to Read?” (381-383), “The Real Generation Gap” (384-393), “In Praise of the F Word” (394-396), “The C Word in the Hallways” (397-399), “A Crime of Compassion” (400-402), and
“Our Vanishing Night” (403-406)
In A Pocket Style Manual:        
Read pages 100-103 (Section 28: “Managing information; avoiding plagiarism”). Begin
reviewing pages 130-154 (Section 33b, “MLA list of works cited”). Also begin reviewing pages  155-162 (Section 34: “MLA manuscript format; sample pages”).
Please note that Section 33c (“MLA information notes”) is not an option in this class.
 
Instructor Handout: “Two Men and Two Paths” by Nicholas Kristof
Instructor Handout: The Thesis Statement
Instructor Handout: Interview Questions
Instructor Handout: Peer Review Process: Comparison/Contrast
 
To be submitted on Moodle:
1. Major Paper #4: rough draft of comparison/contrast (10 %): see Week 8 Moodle block for assignment details
2. Journal #7A: writing strategies: the rough draft (see Week 8 Moodle block for assignment details)         
3. Journal #8:  reading log on argumentation selections (see Week 8 Moodle block for assignment details)
4. Homework Task #2 (for mini research essay): rough draft of Bibliography: five (5) sources due in MLA style (see Week 8 Moodle block for assignment details)           
5. Discussion Board
 
Not to be submitted:
1. Grammar Topic of the Week: in APSM: Section 4: Add needed words (6-8) and Section 19: The apostrophe (65-67): complete practices 4-1 to 4-3 and 19-1 to 19-2 as needed.
2. CCW: loose, lose (266); passed, past (267); precede, proceed (267)
3. Review interview techniques and begin research (for mini research paper: Paper #7)
                       
WEEK 9: Tuesday, November 1st through Monday, November 7th
                  Comparison/contrast, continued; Argumentation, continued; 
                  Cause/Effect; Research Process, continued
Reading:         
In The English Composition Reader
On semi-colons (last half of 31- first half of 32)        
Rhetorical Mode: Cause/Effect (290-293)
“The Closing of the American Book” (294-296), “Why Don’t We Complain?” (297-302), “Losing Private Dwyer” (303-305), and “Words That Wound” (306-309)
In A Pocket Style Manual:            
As needed, review pages 105-154 (Section 29, 30, 31, 32, and 33).
Please note that Section 33c (“MLA information notes”) is not an option in this class.
Instructor Handout: Sample Student Bibliographies
 
To be submitted on Moodle:
1. Major Paper #4: final draft of comparison/contrast (10%): see Week 9 Moodle block for assignment details
2. Journal #7B: writing strategies: the revision (see Week 9 Moodle block for assignment details)
3. Journal #9: reading log: cause/effect selections (see Week 9 Moodle block for assignment details)           
4. Graded Homework Check-up #5: Commas (see Week 9 Moodle block for assignment details)    
5. Homework Task #3: draft of thesis statement (working thesis statement): see Week 9 Moodle block for assignment details)
6. Homework Task #4: ten interview questions you could pose (see Week 9 Moodle block for assignment details)
7. Discussion Board
 
Not to be submitted:
1. Grammar Topic of the Week: in APSM: Section 13: Use adjectives and adverbs appropriately (38-40) and Section 18: The semicolon and the colon (62-65): complete practices 13-1 to 13-2 and 18-1 to 18-3 as needed.
2. CCW: principal, principle (267); set, sit (268); somebody, someone, something (21 & 31)
3. Conduct interview if possible and continue research (for mini research paper: P. #7)         
                           
WEEK 10: Tuesday, November 8th through Monday, November 14th:
                    Process Analysis and Research Process, continued
Reading:         
In The English Composition Reader :          
Rhetorical Mode: Process Analysis (259-261)
“On Dumpster Diving” (262-273), “My First Conk” (274-277), “Writing Drafts” (278-281), and  “Behind the Formaldehyde Curtain” (282-289)
In A Pocket Style Manual:        
As needed, review pages 105-154 (Section 29, 30, 31, 32, and 33).
Instructor Handout: “Fix Your Terrible, Insecure Passwords in Five Minutes” by Farhad Manjoo
 
To be submitted on Moodle:  
1. Major Paper #5: final draft of cause/effect (5%): see Week 10 Moodle block for assignment details       
2. Journal #10: reading log on process analysis selections (see Week 10 Moodle block for assignment details)                    
3. Graded Homework Check-up #6: Apostrophes, Semi-Colons, and Colons (see Week 10 Moodle block for assignment details)      
4. Graded Homework Check-up #7: CCW: Weeks 7 through 9 (see Week 10 Moodle block for assignment details)
5. Homework Task #5 (for mini research essay): working outline (see Week 10 Moodle block for assignment details)            
6. Homework Task #6 (for mini research essay): revision of rough draft of Bibliography (first submitted as Homework Task #2): see Week 9 Moodle block for assignment details    
7. Discussion Board
 
Not to be submitted:
1. Grammar Topic of the Week: in APSM: Section 5: Eliminate confusing shifts (8-9), Section 6: Untangle mixed constructions (9-10), Section 7: Repair misplaced and dangling modifier (10-13), and Section 20: Quotation marks (67-71): complete practices 5-1 to 5-5, 6-1 to 6-3, 7-1 to 7-6, and 20-1 to 2-2 as needed.
2. CCW: than, then (268); that, which (268 & 57-58); there, their, they’re (268)
3. Conduct interview (if you didn’t in Week 9) and continue research (for mini research paper: Paper #7)   
 
WEEK 11: Tuesday, November 15th through Monday, November 21st:
                    Argumentation, continued and Research Process, continued
Reading:
In The English Composition Reader:
No reading      
In A Pocket Style Manual:    
As needed, review pages 105-154 (Section 29, 30, 31, 32, and 33).
 
To be submitted on Moodle:
1. Major Paper #6: final draft of process analysis (5%): see Week 11 Moodle block for assignment details  
2. Homework Task #7 (for mini research essay): one paragraph on interview results/thoughts/conclusions (see Week 11 Moodle block for assignment details)        
3. Discussion board
 
Not to be submitted:
1. Grammar Topic of the Week: in APSM Section 9: Find an appropriate voice (15-18) and Section 21: Other marks (71-74): complete practices 9-1 to 9-4 and 21-1 as needed.
2. CCW: to, too, two (268); weather, whether (269); well, good (39)
3. Finish research (for mini research paper: Paper #7)
                                                                                                           
WEEK 12: Tuesday, November 22nd through Monday, November 28th:  
        Argumentation, continued and Research Process, continued
Reading:         
In The English Composition Reader: 
On capitalization (34 – first three lines of 35)
In A Pocket Style Manual: 
As needed, review pages 105-154 (Section 29, 30, 31, 32, and 33).     
Instructor Handout: Grading Rubric for Paper #7 (mini research essay)
Instructor Handout: Reminder Details before submitting mini research paper: Paper #7
 
To be submitted on Moodle:
1. Homework Task #8 (for mini research essay): due for peer review: opening paragraph – with thesis statement – plus at least the next paragraph (paragraph #2) of paper (see Week 12 Moodle block for assignment details)
2. Discussion board
 
Not to be submitted:
1. Grammar Topic of the Week: in APSM Section 3: Balance parallel ideas (5-6) and Section 22: Capitalization (76-78): complete practices 3-1 to 3-4 and 22-1 as needed.
2. CCW:   who, which, that (269); who’s, whose (269); your, you’re (270)
 
WEEK 13:   Tuesday, November 29th through Monday, December 5th:
                     Classification
Reading:         
In The English Composition Reader
Rhetorical Mode: Division & Classification (341-344)
“Notes on Punctuation” (345-347)
In A Pocket Style Manual: 
Review pages 155-162 (Section 34: “MLA manuscript format; sample pages”).
As needed, review pages 105-154 (Section 29, 30, 31, 32, and 33).
Instructor Handout: “Mother Tongue” by Amy Tan
Instructor Handout: Extra Credit Opportunity #1: Classification (optional) distributed
 
To be submitted on Moodle:
1. Graded Homework Check-up #8: Capitalization (see Week 13 Moodle block for assignment details)
2. Graded Homework Check-up #9: CCW: Weeks 10 through 12 (see Week 13 Moodle block for assignment details)
3. Homework Task #9 (for mini research essay): due for peer review: rough draft of entire paper. This includes the following: the title page, five pages of the body, the “Works Cited” page, and the “Bibliography.” Note: NO EXCEPTION ON THIS DUE DATE.
4. Discussion Board
 
Not to be submitted:
1. Grammar Topic of the Week: in APSM Section 8: Provide sentence variety (13-14): complete practice 8-1 to 8-3 and 9-1 to 9-4 as needed.
2. CCW:  Review
 
WEEK 14:   Tuesday, December 6th through Monday, December 12th:
         Classification, continued
Reading:         
In The English Composition Reader:
Rhetorical Mode: Division & Classification (341-344)
“Notes on Punctuation” (345-347), “The Dog Ate My Disk, and Other Tales of Woe” (348-351), and “The Ways We Lie” (352-359)
In A Pocket Style Manual:    
Review pages 155-162 (Section 34: “MLA manuscript format; sample pages”).  As needed, review pages 105-154 (Section 29, 30, 31, 32, and 33).
 
Instructor Handout: “Birth Order” by Beth Trimmer
Instructor Handout: Extra Credit Opportunity #2: CCW (optional) distributed  
Instructor Handout: Extra Credit Opportunity #3: Journal #11 (optional) distributed
 
To be submitted on Moodle:
1. Due: Extra Credit Opportunity #1: Classification (optional) see Week 13 Moodle block for assignment details
2. Homework Task #10 (for mini research essay): Final draft of mini research paper (MP #7) due. (See Week 14 Moodle block for assignment details)
3. Final draft of mini research paper (MP #7) due. Note: NO LATE PAPERS ACCEPTED (see Week 13 Moodle block for assignment details)
Note: No, you’re not crazy. You submit Major Paper #7 twice, once for a grade as a homework task and once for a grade that is 20% of your semester grade. There will be two places on Week 14’s Moodle block to submit this paper, Paper #7.
4. Discussion Board
 
Not to be submitted:
1. Grammar Topic of the Week: Review
2. CCW: Review
 
WEEK 15:   Tuesday, December 13th through Friday, December 16th:
         Wrap-up of the semester
Reading:
In The English Composition Reader:no reading
In A Pocket Style Manual: no reading 
    
To be submitted on Moodle:
1. Due: Extra Credit Opportunity #2: CCW (optional): see Week 14 Moodle block for assignment details
2. Due: Extra Credit Opportunity #3: Journal #11
 (optional): see Week 14 Moodle block for assignment details
3. Online Presentation/sharing of mini research paper on the discussion board (see Week 15 Moodle block for assignment details)
4. Discussion Board
 
 
IF APPLICABLE: All make-up work due: Friday, December 16th
 

Please note: In order to receive accommodations for disabilities in this course, students must make an appointment to see the Americans with Disabilities Coordinator in their site and bring documentation with them.

Academic Honesty: CCV has a commitment to honesty and excellence in academic work and expects the same from all students. Academic dishonesty, or cheating, can occur whenever you present -as your own work- something that you did not do. You can also be guilty of cheating if you help someone else cheat. Being unaware of what constitutes academic dishonesty (such as knowing what plagiarism is) does not absolve a student of the responsibility to be honest in his/her academic work. Academic dishonesty is taken very seriously and may lead to dismissal from the College.

Course description details subject to change. Please refer to this document frequently.

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